Uitgangsvraag

Wat is de effectiviteit van fysiotherapie na artroscopie vergeleken met alleen artroscopie bij patiënten die artroscopie aan de knie hebben gehad?

Aanbeveling

Verwijs patiënten met een verwacht normaal herstel na een meniscectomie niet standaard naar de fysiotherapeut.

 

Bespreek met de patiënt met een vertraagd herstel wat de te verwachten effecten zijn van fysiotherapie.

Inleiding

After an arthroscopy of the knee, patients can be referred to the physical therapist by the treating specialist. The patient can also end up at the physical therapist on his/her own initiative. In the latter case, the physical therapist will first have to screen the patient. This screening process consists of registration, assessment of the treatment goal, screening to decide whether the patient’s health problem falls within the domain of physical therapy and informing and advising.

 

The physical therapeutic part of this guideline deals with the follow-up treatment of patients who underwent arthroscopy of the knee, such as a (partial) meniscectomy or a meniscus suture. The follow-up treatment of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is discussed in a different guideline and will therefore not be discussed here (see the module Nazorg bij VKB-letsel in the guideline Voorste kruisbandletsel (VKB) and the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) KNGF Evidence Statement na voorste-kruisbandreconstructie).

 

The recovery after an arthroscopy of the knee primarily depends on the type of intervention. In addition, the nature of the injury, the preoperative situation and any other patient-related factors are important. The guideline meniscectomy of the KNGF indicates that during a normal recovery process a patient experiences within 2 weeks postoperatively that pain decreases, and functions, activities and participations increase. Within six weeks postoperatively, a patient should be able to perform normal daily activities without pain or loss of function. During a delayed recovery process, functions, activities and participation do not increase over time, but they remain the same or even decrease with an increase in pain and possible development of other disorders.

 

The question asked by the working group is: what is the value of physical therapy after an arthroscopy of the knee and which are the basic principles of the physical therapeutic treatment?

Conclusies

1. Comparison physical therapy versus no post-operative treatment

Pain

Low

GRADE

Post-operative exercise therapy potentially resulted in a reduction in the level of pain compared with no post-operative treatment in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Østerås, 2014)

 

Psychological problems

Low

GRADE

Post-operative therapy compared with no post-operative treatment potentially did not result in a decrease in psychological problems in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Østerås, 2014)

 

Function

Low

GRADE

Post-operative therapy compared with no post-operative treatment potentially resulted in an increase in function (measured with a one leg hop test) in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Østerås, 2014)

 

Range of motion

-

GRADE

Because of a lack of data, it was not possible to assess the effect of post-operative exercise therapy on the range of motion in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

Muscle strength

Low

GRADE

Post-operative therapy compared with no post-operative treatment potentially resulted in an increase in muscle strength in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Østerås, 2014)

 

2. Comparison physical therapy versus different physical therapy modalities

Pain/ psychological problems/ strength

-

GRADE

Because of a lack of data, it was not possible to assess the effect of physical therapy compared with another form of physical therapy on pain, psychological problems or muscle strength in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

Function

Very low

GRADE

It is uncertain what the effect of post-operative physical therapy plus home exercise compared with only post-operative home exercise is on level of knee function in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Moffet, 1994)

 

Very low

GRADE

It is uncertain what the effect of post-operative rehabilitation compared to post-operative rehabilitation program with additional quadriceps strength training is on level of function in patients who underwent partial meniscectomy for meniscal tear.

 

References (Hsu, 2016)

 

Range of motion

Low

GRADE

There was no difference in the effect of post-operative exercise therapy compared with a different post-operative rehabilitation program on level of range of knee motion or on the time needed to reach full range of motion in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy.

 

References (Forster, 1992; Leonard, 1975)

Samenvatting literatuur

1. Comparison physical therapy versus no post-operative treatment

Description of studies

Patients with degenerative meniscus tears and an arthroscopic partial meniscectomy

Østerås (2014) performed an RCT to study the effects of post-operative exercise therapy compared with no post-operative rehabilitation program in patients who underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. All patients had a degenerative meniscus tear. The exercise program focused on coordination, muscle function and strength training. The program was tailored to the individual participant. Exercises were performed three times per week for three months. In total, 75 participants were included, 38 in the intervention group and 37 in the control group. Patients were assessed at pre-test (1 month), post-test (3 months), and follow-up (12 months). Characteristics of the population were reported for post-test study population only: 36 intervention participants (mean age was 46.3 (SD 8.3) years) and 34 control participants (mean age 46.3 (SD 8.9) years).

 

Results

1. Pain

Østerås (2014) measured pain by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), which ranged from 0-10 (no to most pain). Østerås (2014) reported that pain was lower in patients who received physical therapy after arthroscopy compared to patients who did not receive a post-operative rehabilitation program at 12 months follow-up. Compared to baseline, the mean difference between the intervention and control group was -1.0 (95%CI -1.3 to -0.6) at 12 months follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for baseline score.

 

2. Psychological problems

Østerås (2014) measured symptoms of anxiety and depression via the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), which ranged from 0 to 21 (least to worst). Østerås (2014) reported that there were less psychological problems in patients who received physical therapy after arthroscopy compared with patients who did not receive a post-operative rehabilitation program at 12-month follow-up. Compared with baseline, the mean difference between the intervention and control group was -0.7 (95%CI -1.1 to -0.3) at 12 months follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for baseline score.

 

3. Function

Østerås (2014) measured function via the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which ranged from 0 to 100 (worst to best function). However, the results suggested a decrease in KOOS-score in both groups, but the results were interpreted as a beneficial effect for function. Because of this discrepancy, the results were not described.

 

Østerås (2014) also measured function with a one leg hop test. The pretest values were 85.6% (SD 7.8) in the group who received physiotherapy and 73.2% (SD 8.5). At 12 months follow-up, the values were 96.7% (SD 5.1) and 81.4% (SD 8.3), respectively. The mean difference at 12 months follow-up and adjusted for baseline values was 3.3 (95%CI: 0.6 to 6.1), meaning that the group who received physiotherapy performed the test better than the group who did not receive physiotherapy.

 

4. Range of motion

Østerås (2014) reported no data on the range of motion.

 

5. Muscle strength

Østerås (2014) also measured strength as quadriceps muscle strength using a five-repetition maximum on a leg extension bench. Østerås (2014) reported that strength as measured by the quadricep muscle strength was better in patients who received physical therapy after arthroscopy compared with patients who did not receive a post-operative rehabilitation program at 12 months follow-up. Compared with baseline, the mean difference between the intervention and control group was 4.4 (95%CI 3.2 to 5.6) at 12 months follow-up. Analyses were adjusted for baseline score. The group who received physiotherapy was able to press more weight at 12 months follow-up than the group who did not receive physiotherapy.

 

Levels of evidence of the literature

There are four levels of evidence: high, moderate, low, and very low. RCTs start a high level of evidence.

 

The level of evidence for the outcome measures pain, psychological problems, and strength were downgraded by two levels due to a relative small sample of patients (N=75) and risk of bias (Østerås, 2014). Risk of bias was suspected because of unclear or lack of blinding the treatment allocation for participants, care providers and outcome assessors. In addition, there was significant drop-out during the study and an intention-to-treat analysis was not performed.

 

2. Comparison physical therapy versus different physical therapy modalities

Description of studies

Partial meniscectomy for either a traumatic or degenerative meniscus injury

Hsu (2016) performed an RCT to study the effects of post-operative rehabilitation alone or with additional quadriceps strength training in patients who underwent partial meniscectomy for meniscal tear. It was not specified whether patients underwent arthroscopic or another form of surgery for meniscal tear. All patients received a standard rehabilitation program. Standard rehabilitation consisted of interventions to address typical impairments after meniscectomy and included cryotherapy, compression, elevation, knee range of motion, lower extremity strengthening, lower extremity stretching, and balance exercises. In the group that received additional quadriceps strengthening, subjects also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation to the quadriceps and eccentric overload during quadriceps strengthening exercises. Rehabilitation began within one-week post-surgery and was administered two times per week for six weeks. In total, 22 participants were included (mean age 19.4 (SD 3.0)), 10 receiving standard rehabilitation only (intervention group), 12 receiving standard rehabilitation and additional quadriceps strengthening (control group). Patient characteristics were not presented for treatment groups separately. Patients aged 15-35 were eligible for inclusion; thus, participants <16 years were possibly included, but this cannot be confirmed as the age range of participants was unknown.

 

Moffet (1994) performed an RCT to study the effects of physical therapy plus home exercise compared to home exercise only. Home exercise program was performed three times per week for three weeks. In total, 31 participants were included, 15 patients in the home exercise plus physical therapy group (intervention group; mean age 42 (SD 9) years) and 16 patients in the home exercise group (control group; mean age 38 (SD 7) years).

 

Forster (1982) performed an RCT to study the effects of inpatient treatment plus outpatient physical therapy compared to inpatient treatment only. Duration of inpatient treatment was 12 days, outpatient treatment occurred 3 times per week for 12 weeks. In total, 86 participants were included (mean age unknown, age range 16 to 45), 44 receiving inpatient plus outpatient treatment (intervention group) and 42 receiving inpatient treatment only (control group).

 

Leonard (1975) performed an RCT to study the effects of early treatment with physical therapy at three days post-surgery compared to delayed treatment with physical therapy at ten days post-surgery. The early treatment group consisted of physical therapy plus plaster and weight bearing; the delayed treatment group consisted of physical therapy plus compression bandage and weight bearing. In total, 100 participants were included, 53 in the early treatment group (intervention group; mean age 34.4 (range 13 to 68) years) and 47 in the delayed treatment group (control group; mean age 35.2 (range 16 to 56) years).

 

Results

It was not possible to perform a meta-analysis of the results due to the heterogenous character of the included studies. Results were therefore only descriptively summarized.

 

1. Pain

None of the included RCTs reported data on pain.

 

2. Psychological problems

None of the included RCTs reported data on psychological problems

 

3. Function

Moffet (1994) measured knee function via Lysholm questionnaire (scoring: poor <64; fair 65 to 83; good 84 to 94; excellent 95 to 100). Knee function did not differ in between patients who received physical therapy plus home exercise compared to patients who received home exercise only at 6 months follow-up. The mean score was 91 (SD 14) in the intervention group and 89 (SD 16) at 6 months follow-up.

 

Hsu (2016) measured function via single leg hop performance, which consisted of hop symmetry index and landing mechanisms. Hop symmetry index was calculated as: (average hop distance on the surgical limb/average hop distance on the nonsurgical limb) * 100%. Hsu (2016) reported that single leg hop performance did not significantly differ between patients who underwent post-operative rehabilitation alone or with additional quadriceps strength training. Data was not shown.

 

4. Range of motion

Forster (1992) and Leonard (1975) studied range of knee movement/motion. Both studies concluded that range of knee movement or motion did not differ during follow-up. In Forster (1992), range of knee movement was 139.6 degrees in patients who underwent inpatient treatment plus outpatient physical therapy and 139.9 degrees in patients who undewent inpatient treatment only at 26 weeks follow-up. It was unclear whether the reported number was a mean or a median. In Leonard (1975), mean days to full range of knee motion was 71 (12 to 120) in patients who underwent early treatment with physical therapy and 75 (20 to 112) in patients who underwent delayed treatment with physical therapy.

 

5. Muscle strength

None of the included articles reported data on muscle strength.

 

Levels of evidence of the literature

There are four levels of evidence: high, moderate, low, and very low. RCTs start a high level of evidence.

 

Pain & psychological problems: The level of evidence for the outcome measures pain and psychological problems was not assessed because of lack of data.

 

Knee function: The level of evidence for the outcome measure knee function was downgraded by three levels due to risk of bias (inadequate allocation concealment and lack of blinding of the patients, care providers and outcome assessors) and imprecision (small sample size (N=31 & N=22)).

 

Range of knee motion: The level of evidence for the outcome measure range of knee motion was downgraded by two levels due to risk of bias (lack of blinding of the patients and outcome assessors) and imprecision (small sample size (N=186)).

 

Strength: As none of the included articles reported data on strength, it was not possible to assess the level of evidence.

Zoeken en selecteren

A systematic search of the literature was performed to answer the following question:

1. What are the beneficial and harmful effects of physical therapy after arthroscopy compared with no post-operative treatment in patients who have received arthroscopy of the knee?

 

P: patients who underwent arthroscopy of the knee;

I: physical therapy;

C: no post-operative treatment;

O: recovery as measured in PROMS (questionnaires), range of motion, strength or functional tests, return to play, sports or work.

 

2. What are the beneficial and harmful effects of physical therapy after arthroscopy when comparing different physical therapy modalities in patients who have received arthroscopy of the knee?

 

P: patients who underwent arthroscopy of the knee;

I: physical therapy;

C: different physical therapy modalities;

O: recovery as measured in PROMS (questionnaires), range of motion, muscle strength or functional tests, return to play, sports or work.

 

Relevant outcome measures

The working group considered range of motion and muscle strength or functional test critical outcome measures for decision making and recovery (in PROMS) and return to play sports or work important outcome measures for decision making.

 

The working group defined the outcome measures as follows:

Muscle strength tests measured as isokinetic or isometric strength of at least the quadriceps and hamstrings with an isokinetic device or hand-held dynamometer. Functional tests measures as hop tests or field tests.

 

For both tests, absolute values or a Limb Symmetry Index (LSI) can be used as outcome measures. An LSI of >90% is strived for at the end of rehabilitation.

 

Minimal important differences

The working group used a systematic review by Devji (2017) in which they set out to identify the most credible anchor-based minimal important differences (MIDs) for patient important outcomes in patients with degenerative knee disease. As the patient population in the majority of the included trials (for this question) were patients with degenerative knee disease, these MIDs can be used for this question as well.

 

Pain: An absolute median MID for pain measured with either a WOMAC or KOOS questionnaire was set to 12.

 

ADL: An absolute median MID for ADL measured with a KOOS questionnaire was set to 8.

 

Search and select (Methods)

The databases Medline (via OVID) and Embase (via Embase.com) were searched with relevant search terms. For the update, the databases were searched from the previous search date in 2009 until 31 July 2017. The detailed search strategy is depicted under the tab Methods. The updated systematic literature search resulted in 211 hits. Studies were selected based on the following criteria:

  • systematic reviews with a detailed search strategy, evidence tables and risk of bias evaluation;
  • randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared physical therapy with no post-operative treatment or a different form of physical therapy in ≥16-year-old patients who received arthroscopy of the knee. In addition, only RCTs with a follow-up duration of six months or longer were selected.

The following outcome had to be studied: recovery as measured in PROMS (questionnaires), muscle strength or functional tests, return to play, sports or work.

Twenty-one studies were initially selected based on title and abstract. After reading the full text, eighteen studies were excluded, and one systematic review and two RCT’s were included. In the systematic review of Dias (2013), only 3 of 18 included RCT’s had a follow-up of six months or more. The summary of the literature describes these three RCTs (Forster, 1982; Leonard, 1975; Moffet, 1994) instead of the systematic review.

 

In total, five RCT’s were included in the literature analysis. Of these five RCTs, Østerås (2014) compared physical therapy versus no postoperative treatment and the rest compared different physical therapy modalities. Important study characteristics and results are summarized in the evidence tables. The assessment of the risk of bias is summarized in the risk of bias tables.

 

Old versus new

In the previous version of this guideline, three RCTs (Herrlin, 2007; Roos, 2005; Kirnap, 2005) were included in the summary of the literature. All three RCTs had a follow-up of less than six months and are therefore not included in the revised summary of literature.

Referenties

  1. Devji T, Guyatt GH, Lytvyn L, et al. Application of minimal important differences in degenerative knee disease outcomes: a systematic review and case study to inform BMJ Rapid Recommendations. BMJ Open. 2017;7(5):e015587. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-015587. Review. PubMed PMID: 28495818; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC5777462.
  2. Forster DP, Frost CEB. Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after me¬dial meniscectomy. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1982;284:485-487.
  3. Hsu CJ, George SZ, Chmielewski TL. Association of Quadriceps Strength and Psychosocial Factors With Single-Leg Hop Performance in Patients With Meniscectomy. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine. 2016;4(12).
  4. Leonard MA. An evaluation of two post-meniscectomy régimes. Physiotherapy. 1975;61:110-111.
  5. Moffet H, Richards CL, Malouin F, et al. Early and intensive physiotherapy accelerates recovery postarthroscopic men¬iscectomy: results of a randomized controlled study. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1994;75:415-426.
  6. Osteras H, Osteras B, Torstensen TA. Is postoperative exercise therapy necessary in patients with degenerative meniscus? A randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2014;22(1):200-6.

Evidence tabellen

Research question: What is the effectiveness of physical therapy after arthroscopy compared to no post-operative treatment in patients who have received arthroscopy of the knee?

Study reference

Study characteristics

Patient characteristics 2

Intervention (I)

Comparison / control (C) 3

Follow-up

Outcome measures and effect size 4

Comments

Hsu, 2016

Type of study: RCT

 

Setting:

 

Country: USA

 

Source of funding: this study was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant K01-HD052713.

Inclusion criteria: patients with traumatic onset meniscal tears who underwent partial meniscectomy, aged 15 to 35 years, with meniscectomy performed within 12 months of injury, and meniscal tear confirmed at the time of surgery.

 

Exclusion criteria: bilateral injury, concomitant ligamentous injury, previous knee injury, articular cartilage defect greater than grade 2 on Outerbridge scale confirmed at the time of surgery, patellofemoral joint pain, and lower extremity mechanical axis >5° valgus or varus.

 

N total at baseline: 22 (90.9%M)

Intervention: N=10

Control: N=12

 

Important prognostic factors2:

Data for prognostic factors are only shown for the total group (not separated for allocation of treatment).

 

- Mean age ± SD:

19.4 ± 3.0

 

- Tim from injury to surgery (months) ± SD:

3.3 ± 2.5

 

- Medial meniscectomy N=7

- Lateral meniscectomy N=15.

 

Intervention group: Participants received a standard rehabilitation program.

Rehabilitation began within 1 week post-surgery and was administered 2 times per week for 6 weeks.

 

Standard rehabilitation consisted of interventions to address typical impairments after meniscectomy and included cryotherapy, compression, elevation, knee range of motion, lower extremity strengthening, lower extremity stretching, and balance exercises.

Control group: Participants received standard rehabilitation with additional quadriceps strengthening.

 

Rehabilitation began within 1 week post-surgery and was administered 2 times per week for 6 weeks.

 

Standard rehabilitation consisted of interventions to address typical impairments after meniscectomy and included cryotherapy, compression, elevation, knee range of motion, lower extremity strengthening, lower extremity stretching, and balance exercises.

 

In the additional quadriceps strengthening group, subjects also received neuromuscular electrical stimulation to the quadriceps and eccentric overload during quadriceps strengthening exercises.

Length of follow-up: mean duration of follow-up not reported. Patients were assessed immediately at post-rehabilitation (time unknown) and 12 months follow-up.

 

Loss-to-follow-up:

Not reported.

 

Incomplete outcome data:

Not reported.

Strength

Strength was measured by single leg hop performance. Single leg hop performance consisted of hop symmetry index and landing mechanisms.

 

Hop symmetry index was calculated as: (average hop distance on the surgical limb/average hop distance on the nonsurgical limb)*100%. Single leg hop performance did not significantly differ between groups (data not shown).

 

 

The aim of this study was to compare single-leg hop performance (hop distance and landing mechanics) between limbs in patients with meniscectomy and examine the association of single-leg hop performance with quadriceps strength and psychosocial factors.

 

Important:

- This was a secondary data-analysis of the RCT. Because there were no differences found between the intervention and control group, groups were analysed together, which is not reported in this table.

- Single leg hop distance was conducted as follows: Subjects stood on the nonsurgical limb and performed a maximum-effort forward hop, landing on the same limb. Several practice trials were performed until there was no increase in hop distance, then 3 test trials were performed. The test was repeated on the surgical limb. Distance was recorded, averaged across trials, and used to calculate a hop symmetry index: (average hop distance on the surgical limb/average hop distance on the nonsurgical limb)*100%.

- Single leg hop landing mechanisms were measured as: Marker positions were recorded at 200 Hz with an 8-camera 3dimensional motion capture system (Motion Analysis Corp). Synchronized force data were sampled at 1200 Hz using a 6-component force plate (Advanced Mechanical Technology). The starting point for the single-leg hop was set at 80% of the mean maximal hop distance because pilot testing showed subjects could reliably hop this distance and land in the centre of the force plate. Subjects performed at least 3 practice trials, and 3 successful trials were recorded. A successful trial was defined as the subject landing in the centre of the force plate and holding the landing position for at least 3 seconds. Kinematic and kinetic data were analysed during the landing phase using Visual 3D (version 5.01; C-Motion Inc) and a custom written software program (LabVIEW 2011; National Instruments). Marker positions and force data were low-pass filtered using a second-order Butterworth filter at 6 and 15 Hz, respectively.

Osteras, 2014

Type of study: RCT

 

Setting: patients from orthopaedic surgeons from three hospitals

 

Country: Norway

 

Source of funding: not reported.

Inclusion criteria: patients with knee pain for more than 2-3 months, aged 35-60 years, eligible for arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and having an MRI showing degenerative meniscus tear.

 

Exclusion criteria: ACL rupture, requiring acute trauma surgery, high-energy traumas with ligament injuries, osteoarthritis grade of 3-4, hemarthroses, acute cases of locking knee, symptomatic pain in contrary extremity- and other musculoskeletal comorbidities severely affecting lower extremity muscle function overriding the symptoms from the knee, comorbidities that exclude physical activities and exercise, not being able to speak or read the language of interest, drug abuse or mental problems

 

N total at baseline: 75

Intervention: N=38

Control: N=37

 

Important prognostic factors2:

Data are presented for study population at 3 months follow-up.

N total=70 (67.1% M)

I: N=36 (66.7% M)

C: N=34 (67.6% M)

 

- Mean age ± SD:

I: 46.3 ± 8.3

C: 46.3 ± 8.9

 

- Duration of symptoms (years) ± SD:

I: 2.1 ± 2.3

C: 2.1 ± 1.6

 

- Osteoarthritis level 1 (%):

I: N=9 (25%)

C: N=6 (18%)

 

- Osteoarthritis level 2 (%):

I: N=3 (8%)

C: N=7 (21%)

Intervention group:

Participants in the intervention group followed an exercise program that focused on coordination, muscle function and strength training. The program was individually tailored. Exercises were performed three times per week for three months.

 

Each treatment in the exercise group started with 10–20 min of aerobic work on a stationary ergometer cycle. Half way through the exercise programme, after four exercises of three sets of 30 repetitions each, the subjects bicycled for 10 min and again after the last four exercises, the subjects did another 10 min on a stationary ergometer cycle. The intensity during the bicycle exercises was moderate to high, that is, a heart rate frequency of 70–80 % of the maximal heart rate.

 

Control group: participants in the control group received no rehabilitation program.

 

Length of follow-up: mean duration of follow-up not reported. Patients were assessed at baseline (month 0), pre-test (month 1), post-test (month 3), and 12 months follow-up.

 

At randomization, N=77 patients consented to participate (N=38 intervention, N=39 control group).

Before the study commenced, N=2 (5.1%) participants in the control group withdrew from the study. Reasons not reported.

 

Therefore, N=38 intervention and N=37 control group participants were included in the study.

 

Loss-to-follow-up:

At pre-test (1 month): no lost to follow-up

 

At post-test (3-months)

Intervention:

N=2 (5.3%)

Reasons: refused contact (N=1); medical problem (N=1)

 

Control:

N= 3 (8.1%)

Reasons: refused contact (N=1); medical problem (N=2)

 

At 12 month follow-up (3-months) (including 3 month lost to follow-up).

Intervention:

N= 5 (13.2%)

Reasons: refused contact (N=3); medical problem (N=2)

 

Control:

N= 6 (16.2%)

Reasons: refused contact (N=3); medical problem (N=3)

 

Incomplete outcome data:

Not described. Based on N total, all patients were included.

 

 

Outcome measures reflect the mean difference between two tests (e.g. post-test versus pre-test), adjusted for baseline outcomes.

 

Pain

Measured by VAS (range 0-10, no to most pain).

 

From pre- to post-test:

-1.1 (95%CI -1.5 to -0.6); P<0.01

 

From post-test to 12-month follow-up:

-1.0 (95%CI -1.3 to -0.6); P<0.01

 

Function

Measured by KOOS (range 0-100, worst to least). Comprising pain, other symptoms, activities in daily living, function in sport and recreation, knee-related quality of life.

 

From pre- to post-test:

-10.7 (95%CI -14.7 to -6.7); P<0.01

 

From post-test to 12-month follow-up:

-8.9 (95%CI -11.9 to -5.9); P<0.01

 

Psychological problems

Anxiety and depression as measured by the HADS (0-21, least to worst).

 

From pre- to post-test:

-1.7 (95%CI -2.3 to -1.2); P<0.01

 

From post-test to 12-month follow-up:

-0.7 (95%CI -1.1 to -0.3); P<0.01

 

Strength

Measured by one leg hop test score by calculating the (uninjured side score/injured side score) * 100.

 

From pre- to post-test:

6.2 (95%CI 3.7 to 8.7); P<0.01

 

From post-test to 12-month follow-up:

3.3 (95%CI 0.6 to 6.1); P<0.01

 

Strength

Measured by quadriceps muscle strength with a five repetition maximum on a leg extension bench.

 

From pre- to post-test:

6.5 (95%CI 5.0 to 8.0); P<0.01

 

From post-test to 12-month follow-up:

4.4 (95%CI 3.2 to 5.6); P<0.01

The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical improvements of two rehabilitation approaches after arthroscopic surgery in patients with degenerative meniscus: supervised medical exercise therapy versus no supervised treatment.

 

Important:

- in the study it is reported that the KOOS questionnaire ranges from 0-100, with 100 meaning no knee problems. This is presumably the other way around, as the results are interpreted as a high score indicates less problems.

- The one leg hop test was conducted as follows: patients stood still on one leg and jumped as far as possible. After two practice hops, two hops were performed and the best results was recorded. Each hop test began on the uninjured side, followed by the injured side.

- All patients underwent arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in one of two hospitals.

 

 

Moffet, 1994

Type of study: RCT

 

Setting: Not reported

 

Country: Not reported

 

Source of funding: not reported.

Important patient characteristics at baseline:

 

N, mean age

I: 15 patients, mean age 42 (SD 9) years

C: 16 patients, mean age 38 (SD 7) years.

 

Sex (% male):

I: 100%

C: 100%

 

Physical therapy plus home exercise (3 times per week for 3 weeks).

 

Home exercise group (3 times per week for 3 weeks).

 

End-point of follow-up: pre-surgery, post-surgery 3 weeks, 3 and 6 months.

 

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available?

Not reported

 

Range of knee movement/motion

Not defined in text.

Not assessed.

 

Knee function

Patient-reported knee function as measured via Lysholm questionnaire (range unknown)

 

I:

- pre-surgery: mean 70 (SD 19)

- post-surgery 6 months: mean 91 (SD 14)

C:

- pre-surgery: mean 74 (SD 23)

- post- surgery 6 months: mean 89 (SD 16).

 

Leonard, 1975

Type of study: RCT

 

Setting: Not reported

 

Country: Not reported

 

Source of funding: not reported.

Important patient characteristics at baseline:

 

N, mean age

I: 53 patients, mean age 34.4 (13-68) years.

C: 47 patients, mean age 35.2 (16-56)

 

Sex (% male):

unknown

 

Early treatment group consisted of physical therapy plus plaster and weight bearing within 3 days post-surgery.

 

Delayed treatment group consisted of physical therapy plus compression bandage and weight bearing within 10 days post-surgery.

 

End-point of follow-up:

Post-surgery 6 months.

 

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available?

Not reported

Range of knee movement/motion

Not defined in text.

 

I: mean days to full range of knee motion: 71 (12-120)
C: mean days to full range of knee motion: 75 (20-112)

 

Knee function

Patient-reported knee function as measured via Lysholm questionnaire (range unknown)

 

Not assessed.

 

Forster, 1982

Type of study: RCT

 

Setting: Not reported

 

Country: Not reported

 

Source of funding: not reported.

Important patient characteristics at baseline:

 

N, mean age

I: 44 patients, age range 16-45 years.

C: 42 patients, age range 16-45 years.

 

Sex (% male):

I: 100%

C: 100%

 

Inpatient treatment (12 days) plus outpatient physical therapy (3 times per week for 12 weeks).

 

Inpatient treatment (12 days).

End-point of follow-up:

Pre-surgery, post-surgery 10 days, 4, 6, 10 14, and 26 weeks.

 

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available?

Not reported

Range of knee movement/motion

Not defined in text.

 

I: range of knee movement in degrees:

- pre-surgery: 122.3

- post-surgery 26 weeks: 139.6

C: range of knee movement in degrees:

- pre-surgery: 124.3

- post-surgery 26 weeks: 139.9.

 

 

Knee function

Patient-reported knee function as measured via Lysholm questionnaire (range unknown)

Not assessed.

 

Abbreviations: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS).

Notes:

  1. Prognostic balance between treatment groups is usually guaranteed in randomized studies, but non-randomized (observational) studies require matching of patients between treatment groups (case-control studies) or multivariate adjustment for prognostic factors (confounders) (cohort studies); the evidence table should contain sufficient details on these procedures.
  2. Provide data per treatment group on the most important prognostic factors ((potential) confounders).
  3. For case-control studies, provide sufficient detail on the procedure used to match cases and controls.
  4. For cohort studies, provide sufficient detail on the (multivariate) analyses used to adjust for (potential) confounders.

Research question: What is the effectiveness of physical therapy after arthroscopy compared to no post-operative treatment in patients who have received arthroscopy of the knee?

Study reference

 

 

 

(first author, publication year)

Describe method of randomisation1

Bias due to inadequate concealment of allocation?2

 

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to inadequate blinding of participants to treatment allocation?3

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to inadequate blinding of care providers to treatment allocation?3

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to inadequate blinding of outcome assessors to treatment allocation?3

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to selective outcome reporting on basis of the results?4

 

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to loss to follow-up?5

 

 

 

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Bias due to violation of

intention to treat analysis?6

 

 

 

(unlikely/likely/unclear)

Comparison physical therapy versus no post-operative treatment

Osteras, 2014

A computer-generated randomization schedule was used, with annotations for treatment according to medical exercise therapy or no postoperative rehabilitation.

Unclear, method of allocation concealment is not described.

Likely, patients could not be blinded to the treatment allocation (post-operative exercise therapy versus no rehabilitation process). It is not described in text which steps were undertaken to prevent risk of bias.

Unclear, it is reported in text that “To maintain the blinding of the study, four different well-trained physical therapists conducted the testing and exercise intervention. Additionally, this was a multicentre study, in which the intervention was carried out at four different locations”.

It is not clear how this prevents blinding

Unclear, it is not reported whether the outcome assessors were blinded to treatment allocation.

Unlikely, all predefined outcomes were reported.

Likely, two participants in the control group withdrew from the study for reasons unknown. Further, drop-out is significant in both groups, reasons for drop-out are similar.

Likely, “intention-to-treat analysis was not used because of a low drop-out rate”.

Comparison physical therapy versus a different form of physical therapy

 

Hsu, 2016

A computer-generated randomization scheme was created and balanced to ensure equal allocation to treatment group with stratification by sex.

Unclear, method of allocation concealment is not described.

Unclear, it is not reported whether patients were blinded to the treatment allocation.

Likely, it is not reported whether care providers were blinded to the treatment allocation. It was stated “Two licensed physical therapists supervised the application of all rehabilitation interventions”, which suggests that these therapists were not blinded.

Unclear, it is not reported whether outcome assessors were blinded to the treatment allocation.

Unclear, because there was not statistically significant difference for one of their outcomes (i.e. single leg hop performance), group analysis was performed. It is unclear whether the intervention group and control group were (not) significantly different for the other outcomes (i.e. quadriceps strength, kineasiaphobia, return to sports).

Unclear, loss to follow-up is not reported.

Unclear, it was not reported whether data were analysed as intention-to-treat.

Moffet, 1994 (Extracted from Dias, 2013)

Unclear

Likely

Likely

Likely

Unlikely

Unclear

Likely

Likely

Forster, 1982 (Extracted from Dias, 2013)

Unclear

Unlikely

Likely

Unlikely

Likely

Unclear

Unlikely

Likely

Leonard, 1975 (Extracted from Dias, 2013)

Unclear

Likely

Likely

Likely

Likely

Unclear

Unlikely

Likely

  1. Randomisation: generation of allocation sequences have to be unpredictable, for example computer generated random-numbers or drawing lots or envelopes. Examples of inadequate procedures are generation of allocation sequences by alternation, according to case record number, date of birth or date of admission.
  2. Allocation concealment: refers to the protection (blinding) of the randomisation process. Concealment of allocation sequences is adequate if patients and enrolling investigators cannot foresee assignment, for example central randomisation (performed at a site remote from trial location) or sequentially numbered, sealed, opaque envelopes. Inadequate procedures are all procedures based on inadequate randomisation procedures or open allocation schedules.
  3. Blinding: neither the patient nor the care provider (attending physician) knows which patient is getting the special treatment. Blinding is sometimes impossible, for example when comparing surgical with non-surgical treatments. The outcome assessor records the study results. Blinding of those assessing outcomes prevents that the knowledge of patient assignement influences the proces of outcome assessment (detection or information bias). If a study has hard (objective) outcome measures, like death, blinding of outcome assessment is not necessary. If a study has “soft” (subjective) outcome measures, like the assessment of an X-ray, blinding of outcome assessment is necessary.
  4. Results of all predefined outcome measures should be reported; if the protocol is available, then outcomes in the protocol and published report can be compared; if not, then outcomes listed in the methods section of an article can be compared with those whose results are reported.
  5. If the percentage of patients lost to follow-up is large, or differs between treatment groups, or the reasons for loss to follow-up differ between treatment groups, bias is likely. If the number of patients lost to follow-up, or the reasons why, are not reported, the risk of bias is unclear.
  6. Participants included in the analysis are exactly those who were randomized into the trial. If the numbers randomized into each intervention group are not clearly reported, the risk of bias is unclear; an ITT analysis implies that (a) participants are kept in the intervention groups to which they were randomized, regardless of the intervention they actually received, (b) outcome data are measured on all participants, and (c) all randomized participants are included in the analysis.

Overwegingen

Fysiotherapie is over het algemeen genomen een veilige en relatief goedkope interventie die nauwelijks risico’s en/of complicaties met zich mee brengt. De fysiotherapeut dient uiteraard te beschikken over de juiste ervaring, deskundigheid en voorzieningen, zoals een ruimte om naar behoren krachttraining en neuromusculaire training met de patiënt te kunnen uitvoeren. Na een meniscectomie zullen de eerste 20 behandelingen vergoed dienen te worden uit de aanvullende verzekering van de patiënt. Vanaf de 21e behandeling geldt er tot 12 maanden na de meniscectomie een vergoeding uit de basisverzekering. Mocht de patiënt minder dan 20 behandelingen in zijn aanvullende verzekering hebben, dan zal hij dus zelf voor de kosten van de eerste 20 behandelingen fysiotherapie opdraaien.

 

De huidige maatschappij eist een zo spoedig mogelijke terugkeer in het arbeidsproces en fysiotherapie kan hier een belangrijke bijdrage aan leveren. De fysiotherapeut zal de patiënt altijd stimuleren de dagelijkse activiteiten weer op te nemen. Daarnaast is het vaak ook de wens van de patiënt snel terug te kunnen keren op het oude niveau bijvoorbeeld als het gaat om sportbeoefening. Bij bepaalde beroepsgroepen (topsporters, zwaar lichamelijke arbeid) kan begeleiding in het postoperatieve herstel dan ook zinvol zijn, ook om secundair letsel te voorkomen. Het kan bijvoorbeeld nuttig zijn om een topsporter frequenter te controleren in verband met een stapsgewijze opbouw. Deze groep patiënten negeert vaak symptomen, omdat zij weer snel aan de competitie willen deelnemen of vanwege druk door de media, de coach of de sporter zelf.

 

Het is niet alleen het meniscusletsel dat bepaalt of de patiënt verwezen moet worden naar de fysiotherapeut maar meer of er sprake is van normaal of (te verwachten) vertraagd herstel zoals na een laterale meniscectomie of indien er sprake is van bijkomende kraakbeenschade. Het KNGF maakt in de richtlijn meniscectomie onderscheid in twee patiëntenprofielen. Patiëntprofiel 1 betreft over het algemeen patiënten die niet of nauwelijks fysiotherapie nodig hebben omdat er sprake is van een normaal herstel. Dit zijn meestal de jongere patiënten met een acuut letsel van de meniscus, met een blanco voorgeschiedenis. Fysiotherapie is bij deze groep wel wenselijk als er sprake is van comorbiditeit (zoals een VKB-ruptuur) of bewegingsangst.

 

Patiëntprofiel 2 zijn vaak de patiënten met een belaste voorgeschiedenis (al eerdere knieoperaties gehad) waarbij de klachten zijn ontstaan na herhaalde (micro)traumata waardoor er meervoudige en degeneratieve rupturen in de meniscus ontstaan. Ook kan er sprake zijn van artrose. Deze patiënten hebben een groot risico op een vertraagd herstel en is fysiotherapie geïndiceerd. Er kan sprake zijn van een vertraagd herstel bij onvoldoende toename van de functie (mobiliteit, gangpatroon) en onvoldoende toename of zelfs achteruitgang van activiteiten en participatie. In dat geval kan fysiotherapie bijdragen aan verbetering van mobiliteit, herstel van het gangpatroon en toename van kracht en neuromusculaire controle, waardoor ook activiteiten en participatie kunnen toenemen. Echter, zoals in deze richtlijn besproken, komen deze patiënten in de meeste gevallen niet eens meer in aanmerking voor een artroscopie.

Autorisatiedatum en geldigheid

Laatst beoordeeld :

Laatst geautoriseerd :

Voor het beoordelen van de actualiteit van deze richtlijn is de werkgroep wel in stand gehouden. Uiterlijk in 2024 bepaalt het bestuur van de NOV of de modules van deze richtlijn nog actueel zijn. Op modulair niveau is een onderhoudsplan beschreven. Bij het opstellen van de richtlijn heeft de werkgroep per module een inschatting gemaakt over de maximale termijn waarop herbeoordeling moet plaatsvinden en eventuele aandachtspunten geformuleerd die van belang zijn bij een toekomstige herziening (update). De geldigheid van de richtlijn komt eerder te vervallen indien nieuwe ontwikkelingen aanleiding zijn een herzieningstraject te starten.

 

De NOVen de KNGF zijn regiehouders van deze module en eerstverantwoordelijke op het gebied van de actualiteitsbeoordeling van de richtlijn. De andere aan deze richtlijn deelnemende wetenschappelijke verenigingen of gebruikers van de richtlijn delen de verantwoordelijkheid en informeren de regiehouder over relevante ontwikkelingen binnen hun vakgebied.

 

Module1

Regiehouder(s)2

Jaar van autorisatie

Eerstvolgende beoordeling actualiteit richtlijn3

Frequentie van beoordeling op actualiteit4

Wie houdt er toezicht op actualiteit5

Relevante factoren voor wijzigingen in aanbeveling6

Module 3 Nazorg

NOV, KNGF

2019

2024

Eens in 5 jaar

KNGF

-

1 Naam van de module

2 Regiehouder van de module (deze kan verschillen per module en kan ook verdeeld zijn over meerdere regiehouders)

3 Maximaal na vijf jaar

4 (half)Jaarlijks, eens in twee jaar, eens in vijf jaar

5 Regievoerende vereniging, gedeelde regievoerende verenigingen, of (multidisciplinaire) werkgroep die in stand blijft

6 Lopend onderzoek, wijzigingen in vergoeding/organisatie, beschikbaarheid nieuwe middelen

Initiatief en autorisatie

Initiatief : Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging

Geautoriseerd door:
  • Koninklijk Nederlands Genootschap voor Fysiotherapie
  • Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging
  • Nederlandse Vereniging voor Heelkunde
  • Nederlandse Vereniging voor Radiologie
  • Vereniging voor Sportgeneeskunde

Algemene gegevens

De richtlijnontwikkeling werd ondersteund door het Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten (www.kennisinstituut.nl) en werd gefinancierd uit de Stichting Kwaliteitsgelden Medisch Specialisten (SKMS).

Doel en doelgroep

Doel

Deze richtlijn beoogt uniform beleid ten aanzien van de zorg bij patiënten met knieletsels die mogelijk behandeld kunnen worden met een artroscopische ingreep.

 

Doelgroep

Deze richtlijn is geschreven voor alle leden van de beroepsgroepen van orthopaedisch chirurgen, sportartsen, fysiotherapeuten, radiologen en traumachirurgen die betrokken zijn bij de zorg voor patiënten met (acute) knieletsels. Daarnaast is deze richtlijn bedoeld om zorgverleners die anderzijds betrokken zijn bij deze patiënten, te informeren, waaronder kinderartsen, revalidatieartsen, huisartsen, physician assistants en verpleegkundig specialisten.

Samenstelling werkgroep

Voor het ontwikkelen van de richtlijn is in 2016 een multidisciplinaire werkgroep ingesteld, bestaande uit vertegenwoordigers van alle relevante specialismen die betrokken zijn bij de zorg voor patiënten met (acute) knieletsels te maken hebben. De werkgroepleden zijn door hun beroepsverenigingen gemandateerd voor deelname. De werkgroep is verantwoordelijk voor de integrale tekst van deze richtlijn.

  • Dr. E.R.A. (Ewoud) van Arkel, orthopedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het Haaglanden Medisch Centrum te Den Haag, NOV, voorzitter
  • Drs. A. (Bert) van Essen, sportarts, werkzaam bij het Maxima Medisch Centrum te Veldhoven, VSG
  • Dr. S. (Sander) Koëter, orthopedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het Canisius Wilhelmina Ziekenhuis te Nijmegen, NOV
  • Drs. N. (Nicky) van Melick, sportfysiotherapeut en bewegingswetenschapper, werkzaam bij het Knie Expertise Centrum te Eindhoven, KNGF
  • Dr. P.C. (Paul) Rijk, orthopedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het Medisch Centrum Leeuwarden te Leeuwarden, NOV
  • Drs. M.J.M. (Michiel) Segers, traumachirurg, werkzaam in het Sint Antonius Ziekenhuis te Utrecht, NVvH
  • Dr. T.G. (Tony) van Tienen, orthopedisch chirurg, werkzaam in de kliniek Via Sana te Mill, NOV
  • Dr. P.W.J. (Patrice) Vincken, radioloog, werkzaam bij Alrijne Zorggroep te Leiderdorp, NVvR

 

Meelezers:

  • Patiëntenfederatie Nederland te Utrecht

 

Met ondersteuning van:

  • Dr. B.H. (Bernardine) Stegeman, adviseur, Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten
  • Dr. J. (Janneke) Hoogervorst-Schilp, adviseur, Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten

Belangenverklaringen

De KNMG-Code ter voorkoming van oneigenlijke beïnvloeding door belangenverstrengeling is gevolgd. Alle werkgroepleden hebben schriftelijk verklaard of ze in de laatste drie jaar directe financiële belangen (betrekking bij een commercieel bedrijf, persoonlijke financiële belangen, onderzoeksfinanciering) of indirecte belangen (persoonlijke relaties, reputatie management, kennisvalorisatie) hebben gehad. Een overzicht van de belangen van werkgroepleden en het oordeel over het omgaan met eventuele belangen vindt u in onderstaande tabel. De ondertekende belangenverklaringen zijn op te vragen bij het secretariaat van het Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten.

 

Werkgroeplid

Functie

Nevenfuncties

Gemelde belangen

Ondernomen actie

Arkel, van (voorzitter)

Orthopaedisch chirurg

Opleider orthopedie Haaglanden Medisch Centrum

-

Geen actie

Essen, van

Sportarts

Medisch directeur SMC

-

Geen actie

Tienen, van

Orthopaedisch chirurg

  • Consultant voor A Tro Medical (meniscus implantaat)
  • Consultant voor FH orthopedics

-

Geen actie (meniscusimplantaten en knieprotheses vallen buiten de afbakening van de richtlijn)

Melick

Sportfysiotherapeut

  • Promovendus “Functional performance in sports after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction”
  • Verzorgen van lezingen en trainingen via Progress Educations en Kneesearch (eigen bedrijf)

-

Geen actie (valt buiten de afbakening van de richtlijn)

Rijk

Orthopaedisch chirurg

-

-

Geen actie

Vincken

Radioloog

-

-

Geen actie

Segers

Traumachirurg

Consultant voor DePuy Synthes Trauma

-

Geen actie (producten geproduceerd door DePuy Synthes Trauma vallen buiten de afbakening van de richtlijn)

Koëter

Orthopaedisch chirurg

Hoofd research support office CWZ

-

Geen actie

Inbreng patiëntenperspectief

Er werd aandacht besteed aan het patiëntenperspectief door een meelezer vanuit de Patiëntenfederatie Nederland. Tijdens de oriënterende zoekactie werd gezocht op literatuur naar patiëntenperspectief (zie Strategie voor zoeken en selecteren van literatuur). De conceptrichtlijn is tevens voor commentaar voorgelegd aan de Patiëntenfederatie Nederland.

Methode ontwikkeling

Evidence based

Implementatie

In de verschillende fasen van de richtlijnontwikkeling is rekening gehouden met de implementatie van de richtlijn (module) en de praktische uitvoerbaarheid van de aanbevelingen. Daarbij is uitdrukkelijk gelet op factoren die de invoering van de richtlijn in de praktijk kunnen bevorderen of belemmeren. Het implementatieplan is te vinden bij de aanverwante producten.

Werkwijze

AGREE

Deze richtlijn is opgesteld conform de eisen vermeld in het rapport Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen 2.0 van de adviescommissie Richtlijnen van de Raad Kwaliteit. Dit rapport is gebaseerd op het AGREE II instrument (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II; Brouwers, 2010), dat een internationaal breed geaccepteerd instrument is. Voor een stap-voor-stap beschrijving hoe een evidence-based richtlijn tot stand komt wordt verwezen naar het stappenplan Ontwikkeling van Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen van het Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten.

 

Knelpuntenanalyse

Tijdens de voorbereidende fase inventariseerden de voorzitter van de werkgroep en de adviseur de knelpunten. De werkgroep beoordeelde de aanbevelingen uit de eerdere richtlijn (NOV, 2010) op noodzaak tot revisie. Tevens zijn er knelpunten aangedragen door een Invitational conference. Een verslag hiervan is opgenomen onder aanverwante producten. De werkgroep stelde vervolgens een long list met knelpunten op en prioriteerde de knelpunten op basis van: (1) klinische relevantie; (2) de beschikbaarheid van (nieuwe) evidence van hoge kwaliteit; (3) en de te verwachten impact op de kwaliteit van zorg, patiëntveiligheid en (macro)kosten.

 

Uitgangsvragen en uitkomstmaten

Op basis van de uitkomsten van de knelpuntenanalyse zijn door de voorzitter en de adviseur concept-uitgangsvragen opgesteld. Deze zijn met de werkgroep besproken waarna de werkgroep de definitieve uitgangsvragen heeft vastgesteld. Vervolgens inventariseerde de werkgroep per uitgangsvraag welke uitkomstmaten voor de patiënt relevant zijn, waarbij zowel naar gewenste als ongewenste effecten werd gekeken. De werkgroep waardeerde deze uitkomstmaten volgens hun relatieve belang bij de besluitvorming rondom aanbevelingen, als kritiek, belangrijk (maar niet kritiek) en onbelangrijk. Tevens definieerde de werkgroep tenminste voor de kritieke uitkomstmaten welke verschillen zij klinisch (patiënt) relevant vonden.

 

Strategie voor zoeken en selecteren van literatuur

Er werd eerst oriënterend gezocht naar bestaande buitenlandse richtlijnen (via Medline (OVID), GIN en NICE), systematische reviews (via Medline, en literatuur over patiëntenvoorkeuren en patiëntrelevante uitkomstmaten (patiëntenperspectief; Medline (OVID)). Vervolgens werd voor de afzonderlijke uitgangsvragen aan de hand van specifieke zoektermen gezocht naar gepubliceerde wetenschappelijke studies in (verschillende) elektronische databases. Tevens werd aanvullend gezocht naar studies aan de hand van de literatuurlijsten van de geselecteerde artikelen. In eerste instantie werd gezocht naar studies met de hoogste mate van bewijs. De werkgroepleden selecteerden de via de zoekactie gevonden artikelen op basis van vooraf opgestelde selectiecriteria. De geselecteerde artikelen werden gebruikt om de uitgangsvraag te beantwoorden. De databases waarin is gezocht, de zoekstrategie en de gehanteerde selectiecriteria zijn te vinden in de module met desbetreffende uitgangsvraag. De zoekstrategie voor de oriënterende zoekactie en patiëntenperspectief zijn opgenomen onder aanverwante producten.

 

Kwaliteitsbeoordeling individuele studies

Individuele studies werden systematisch beoordeeld, op basis van op voorhand opgestelde methodologische kwaliteitscriteria, om zo het risico op vertekende studieresultaten (risk of bias) te kunnen inschatten. Deze beoordelingen kunt u vinden in de Risk of Bias (RoB) tabellen. De gebruikte RoB instrumenten zijn gevalideerde instrumenten die worden aanbevolen door de Cochrane Collaboration: AMSTAR – voor systematische reviews; Cochrane – voor gerandomiseerd gecontroleerd onderzoek; Newcastle-Ottawa – voor observationeel onderzoek; QUADAS II – voor diagnostisch onderzoek.

 

Samenvatten van de literatuur

De relevante onderzoeksgegevens van alle geselecteerde artikelen werden overzichtelijk weergegeven in evidence-tabellen. De belangrijkste bevindingen uit de literatuur werden beschreven in de samenvatting van de literatuur. Bij een voldoende aantal studies en overeenkomstigheid (homogeniteit) tussen de studies werden de gegevens ook kwantitatief samengevat (meta-analyse) met behulp van Review Manager 5.

 

Beoordelen van de kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs

A) Voor interventievragen (vragen over therapie of screening)

De kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs werd bepaald volgens de GRADE-methode. GRADE staat voor Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (zie http://www.gradeworkinggroup.org/).

 

GRADE onderscheidt vier gradaties voor de kwaliteit van het wetenschappelijk bewijs: hoog, redelijk, laag en zeer laag. Deze gradaties verwijzen naar de mate van zekerheid die er bestaat over de literatuurconclusie (Schünemann, 2013).

 

GRADE

Definitie

Hoog

  • er is hoge zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • het is zeer onwaarschijnlijk dat de literatuurconclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Redelijk

  • er is redelijke zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • het is mogelijk dat de conclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Laag

  • er is lage zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • er is een reële kans dat de conclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Zeer laag

  • er is zeer lage zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • de literatuurconclusie is zeer onzeker.

 

B) Voor vragen over diagnostische tests, schade of bijwerkingen, etiologie en prognose

De kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs werd eveneens bepaald volgens de GRADE-methode: GRADE-diagnostiek voor diagnostische vragen (Schünemann, 2008), en een generieke GRADE-methode voor vragen over schade of bijwerkingen, etiologie en prognose. In de gehanteerde generieke GRADE-methode werden de basisprincipes van de GRADE-methodiek toegepast: het benoemen en prioriteren van de klinisch (patiënt) relevante uitkomstmaten, een systematische review per uitkomstmaat, en een beoordeling van bewijskracht op basis van de vijf GRADE-criteria (startpunt hoog; downgraden voor risk of bias, inconsistentie, indirectheid, imprecisie, en publicatiebias).

 

Formuleren van de conclusies

Voor elke relevante uitkomstmaat werd het wetenschappelijk bewijs samengevat in een of meerdere literatuurconclusies waarbij het niveau van bewijs werd bepaald volgens de GRADE-methodiek. De werkgroepleden maakten de balans op van elke interventie (overall conclusie). Bij het opmaken van de balans werden de gunstige en ongunstige effecten voor de patiënt afgewogen. De overall bewijskracht wordt bepaald door de laagste bewijskracht gevonden bij een van de kritieke uitkomstmaten. Bij complexe besluitvorming waarin naast de conclusies uit de systematische literatuuranalyse vele aanvullende argumenten (overwegingen) een rol spelen, werd afgezien van een overall conclusie. In dat geval werden de gunstige en ongunstige effecten van de interventies samen met alle aanvullende argumenten gewogen onder het kopje Overwegingen.

 

Overwegingen (van bewijs naar aanbeveling)

Om te komen tot een aanbeveling zijn naast (de kwaliteit van) het wetenschappelijke bewijs ook andere aspecten belangrijk en worden meegewogen, zoals de expertise van de werkgroepleden, de waarden en voorkeuren van de patiënt (patient values and preferences), kosten, beschikbaarheid van voorzieningen en organisatorische zaken. Deze aspecten worden, voor zover geen onderdeel van de literatuursamenvatting, vermeld en beoordeeld (gewogen) onder het kopje Overwegingen.

 

Formuleren van aanbevelingen

De aanbevelingen geven antwoord op de uitgangsvraag en zijn gebaseerd op het beschikbare wetenschappelijke bewijs en de belangrijkste overwegingen, en een weging van de gunstige en ongunstige effecten van de relevante interventies. De kracht van het wetenschappelijk bewijs en het gewicht dat door de werkgroep wordt toegekend aan de overwegingen, bepalen samen de sterkte van de aanbeveling. Conform de GRADE-methodiek sluit een lage bewijskracht van conclusies in de systematische literatuuranalyse een sterke aanbeveling niet a priori uit, en zijn bij een hoge bewijskracht ook zwakke aanbevelingen mogelijk. De sterkte van de aanbeveling wordt altijd bepaald door weging van alle relevante argumenten tezamen.

 

Randvoorwaarden (Organisatie van zorg)

In de knelpuntenanalyse en bij de ontwikkeling van de richtlijn is expliciet rekening gehouden met de organisatie van zorg: alle aspecten die randvoorwaardelijk zijn voor het verlenen van zorg (zoals coördinatie, communicatie, (financiële) middelen, menskracht en infrastructuur). Randvoorwaarden die relevant zijn voor het beantwoorden van een specifieke uitgangsvraag maken onderdeel uit van de overwegingen bij de bewuste uitgangsvraag. Meer algemene, overkoepelende, of bijkomende aspecten van de organisatie van zorg worden behandeld in de module Organisatie van zorg rond artroscopie knie.

 

Kennislacunes

Tijdens de ontwikkeling van deze richtlijn is systematisch gezocht naar onderzoek waarvan de resultaten bijdragen aan een antwoord op de uitgangsvragen. Bij elke uitgangsvraag is door de werkgroep nagegaan of er (aanvullend) wetenschappelijk onderzoek gewenst is om de uitgangsvraag te kunnen beantwoorden. Een overzicht van de onderwerpen waarvoor (aanvullend) wetenschappelijk van belang wordt geacht, is als aanbeveling in de Kennislacunes beschreven (onder aanverwante producten).

 

Commentaar- en autorisatiefase

De conceptrichtlijn werd aan de betrokken (wetenschappelijke) verenigingen en (patiënt) organisaties voorgelegd ter commentaar. De commentaren werden verzameld en besproken met de werkgroep. Naar aanleiding van de commentaren werd de conceptrichtlijn aangepast en definitief vastgesteld door de werkgroep. De definitieve richtlijn werd aan de deelnemende (wetenschappelijke) verenigingen en (patiënt) organisaties voorgelegd voor autorisatie en door hen geautoriseerd dan wel geaccordeerd.

 

Literatuur

Brouwers MC, Kho ME, Browman GP, et al. AGREE Next Steps Consortium. AGREE II: advancing guideline development, reporting and evaluation in health care. CMAJ. 2010;182(18):E839-42. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.090449. Epub 2010 Jul 5. Review. PubMed PMID: 20603348.

Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen 2.0. Adviescommissie Richtlijnen van de Raad Kwalitieit. https://richtlijnendatabase.nl/over_deze_site/richtlijnontwikkeling.html. 2012.

Schünemann H, Brożek J, Guyatt G, et al. GRADE handbook for grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Updated October 2013. The GRADE Working Group, 2013. Available from http://gdt.guidelinedevelopment.org/central_prod/_design/client/handbook/handbook.html.

Schünemann HJ, Oxman AD, Brozek J, et al. Grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations for diagnostic tests and strategies. BMJ. 2008;336(7653):1106-10. doi: 10.1136/bmj.39500.677199.AE. Erratum in: BMJ. 2008;336(7654). doi: 10.1136/bmj.a139. PubMed PMID: 18483053.

Ontwikkeling van Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen: stappenplan. Kennisinstituut van Medisch Specialisten.

Zoekverantwoording

Zoekacties zijn opvraagbaar. Neem hiervoor contact op met de Richtlijnendatabase.