Uitgangsvraag

Wat zijn de indicaties voor een niet-operatieve behandeling of een operatieve behandeling van voorste kruisbandletsel?

Aanbeveling

Informeer een patiënt met VKB-letsel over de operatieve en niet-operatieve behandelmogelijkheden. Zie ook de consultkaart Voorstekruisbandletsel: Revalideren of Operatie met revalidatie.

 

Adviseer VKB-reconstructie aan patiënten met symptomatische instabiliteit van de knie, welke niet verbetert na fysiotherapie, en niet reageert op aanpassing van de activiteiten.

 

Informeer jongere patiënten (<20 jaar) en patiënten met een zeer actieve levensstijl (sporters) over de mogelijk verhoogde kans op re-ruptuur na een operatieve behandeling.

 

Betrek in de besluitvorming dat een VKB-reconstructie letsels aan kraakbeen en meniscus, en operaties daarvoor, kan voorkómen.

 

Informeer patiënten dat een VKB-reconstructie geen invloed heeft op de ontwikkeling van secundaire artrose van de knie.

 

Leg aan patiënten ouder dan 30 jaar met een lager activiteitenniveau een niet-operatieve behandeling als alternatief voor.

 

Adviseer en ondersteun patiënten met VKB-letsel, zowel voor als na een operatie, om te stoppen met roken en hun BMI binnen de normale grenzen te brengen, indien van toepassing. Zie voor de interventies ter ondersteuning van stoppen met roken en verlagen BMI de CBO-richtlijnen Behandeling van Tabaksverslaving en Diagnostiek en behandeling van obesitas.

Inleiding

After diagnosing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, a patient-tailored treatment course should be chosen. Therapy-resistant symptomatic rotational instability (giving way) that influences the patient's desired activities may form an indication for surgical treatment. However, it is important to include specific expectations of the patient in decision-making. The choice between surgical or non-surgical treatment depends on many factors: degree of instability, functional limitations, desired activity level, risk of and fear of recurrent knee injury and general issues such as quality of life of the patient. Besides, the expected results of the operation and the time and effort required for rehabilitation should also be considered in the decision. There is a group of patients with a proven lesion of the ACL that experience minor or even no complaints and/or limitations of instability in daily life but also during sporting activities. On the other hand, knee instability can be a clear limitation in daily life and sports activities. In this light, it is important to individualise the decision and to include in the treatment advice all known factors that may influence the outcome.

 

The current experience is that after reconstruction, 85 to 90% of patients have objectively improved knee stability. After an ACL reconstruction, patients undergo significantly fewer surgical procedures for meniscal and cartilage injuries. However, it is substantiated that ACL reconstruction does not prevent osteoarthritis to the knee joint. Despite that, a large group of patients does not reach the level of activity they had before injury. Failure of the reconstruction occurs in 5-10% of patients, mostly within the first 5 years.

 

In this chapter, the prognostic factors that can be used as criteria for considering the indication for an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction will be investigated.

Conclusies

Successful surgical treatment based on post-operative PROMs

Activity level

Low

GRADE

Male gender, normal BMI and not smoking could be associated with better functional activity levels compared to female gender, high BMI and smoking.

 

Sources (De Valk, 2013; An, 2016, Barenius, 2013)

 

IKDC, KOOS and Lysholm

Low

GRADE

Not smoking and good perceived self-efficacy could be associated with better subjective IKDC and KOOS scores compared to smoking and no self-efficacy. There seems to be no association between gender and better IKDC and KOOS scores.

 

Sources (De Valk, 2013; An, 2016; Everhart, 2015)

 

Very low

GRADE

The effect of age on IKDC, KOOS and Lysholm is unclear.

 

Sources (De Valk, 2013; An, 2016; Scherer, 2016)

 

Successful surgical treatment based on return to sport

Very low

GRADE

It is uncertain wether patients with a higher motivation to return to sport, return to sport more often. Because of a lack of reported data, it was not possible to form a conclusion on other predictors for the outcome return to sport.

 

Sources (Everhart, 2015)

 

Failure of surgical treatment based on graft failure

Low

GRADE

Younger patients, especially <20 years of age seem to have a higher risk of graft failure and revision surgery compared to older patients. Patients with a higher activity level seem to have a higher chance on graft re-tear.

 

Sources (An, 2016; Yabroudi, 2016; Magnussen, 2012; Ponce, 2015; Kaeding, 2014)

 

Failure of surgical treatment based on graft failure or revision surgery

Low

GRADE

There seems to be no association between BMI and gender and the risk of graft failure or revision surgery.

 

Sources (An, 2016; Andernord, 2015; Yabroudi, 2016; Kaeding, 2014)

 

Successful non-surgical treatment

Low

GRADE

Those with higher age (27.9 years versus 23.8 years) and a lower activity level seem to have a higher chance to complete a non-surgical treatment programme successfully.

 

Sources (Eitzen, 2010)

Samenvatting literatuur

Description studies

In a systematic review, An (2016) studied which patient demographic factors, injury characteristics and surgical factors predicted graft failure and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) a minimum of two years after ACL reconstruction with single-bundle quadruple hamstring autograft via the anteromedial portal technique. The search was performed in June 2015. A total of 26 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Fourteen Studies were considered high-level evidence, following the Downs and Black score and were included in the final analysis. A total of 30,287 patients were included in these fourteen studies (range 63 to 12,643 per study). Follow-up time was not reported. Predictors were categorised in demographic factors, associated injury and surgical factors. Psychological or rehabilitation-related factors that may have influenced PROMs were not included. A meta-analysis could not be performed, due the heterogeneity of the outcomes in the included studies.

 

Everhart (2015) studied which psychological factors at baseline predict clinically relevant ACL reconstruction outcomes, including return to sport, rehabilitation compliance, knee pain and knee function. The search was performed from 1975 to June 2012. Only studies with a prospective study design and with a study population of physically active individuals of any experience level with an age range of 13 to 65 years were included. A total of eight prospective studies were included in the review, with a total of 531 patients (range 38 to 100). The follow-up ranged from 3 to 69 months. No meta-analysis could be performed.

 

De Valk (2013) performed a meta-analysis to determine which patient demographic factors and injury characteristics predict successful post-operative rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction with arthroscopic single-bundle techniques. The search was performed in February 2013. The systematic review was limited to the most commonly used, single-bundle techniques. The full text of 36 studies were included, but only 18 studies with score ≥7 (maximum 9) on the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) were included in the analysis. A total of 3,073 patients were included (range 40 to 402). The follow-up ranged from 1 to 7 years. Meta-analysis could only be performed for gender, as heterogeneity between studies and missing data hampered meta-analyses for other predictors.

 

Besides these three systematic reviews, another ten cohort studies and case-control studies were included in the literature analysis (Andernord, 2015; Barenius, 2015; Eitzen, 2010; Kamien, 2013; Kaeding, 2014; Magnussen, 2012; Ponce, 2015; Scherer, 2016; Robb, 2015 and Yabroudi, 2016).

 

One study investigated ACL reconstruction (versus conservative treatment) as outcome (Eitzen, 2010). A total of 145 patients with ACL insufficiency were studied to determine which characteristics at baseline were associated with choosing an ACL reconstruction or continuing conservative treatment. The investigated characteristics were age, KT-1000, KOS-ADLS, VAS, IKDC2000, different hop tests and quadriceps strength, gender, activity level and giving way.

 

All nine other studies were performed prospectively in patients who underwent a primary ACL reconstruction. The number of included patients ranged from 98 to 16,930 and the follow-up from 6 months to a maximum of 7 years. The mean age ranged between 17 and 28 years. Failure of treatment was investigated as outcome, with four studies defining failure as revision ACL surgery (Andernord, 2015; Magnussen, 2012; Ponce, 2015; Yabroudi, 2016), one as a low KOOS QoL score Barenius, (2015) and one as reported failure rate Kamien, (2013). PROMs were reported as outcome in only one study (Scherer, 2016) and return to sport was reported in one study Lentz, (2012). The investigated prognostic factors differed between the studies. Most studies analysed demographic factors like gender, age and BMI and activity level.

 

Results

1. Patient-reported outcome measures

As indicators of PROMs, the results of the IKDC score, KOOS, Lysholm score and Tegner score were considered. For some of the PROMs - such as the Lysholm, Tegner and Koos scores - normative values considering age and sex are known. The average Lysholm score is 94 (range, 43 to 100) and the average Tegner activity level is 5.7 (range, 1 to 10). The Lysholm score and age demonstrated no correlation. The Tegner activity level was inversely correlated with age. There was no significant difference in the Lysholm score between men and women Briggs, (2009). A significant decline in KOOS outcomes was observed in older cohorts for women, but not for men (Williamson, 2016).

 

Gender: De Valk (2013) performed a meta-analysis on factors for successful rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction with three studies concerning different outcome measure. They found that males reached a higher activity level after ACL reconstruction compared to females (standardised mean difference 0.28; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.51). In the systematic review by An et al., only 1 of the 7 higher-level studies that studied the effect of gender found a relationship between gender and outcome scores.

 

Age: In the study by Brandsson (2000), included in the review by De Valk, young patients (20 to 24 yr) had a higher Tegner activity level after at least 22 months follow-up compared with older patients (>40 yr) (young: 6 (range 1 to 9), old: 5 (range 3 to 9), P=0.032). IKDC and Lysholm did not show a statistically significant difference. In the study of Osti (2011) patients <30 yr had higher IKDC sport activity levels compared to patients >50 yr after 2-yr follow-up (young: 92 (range 80 to 100), old: 91 (range 80 to 100)), but the difference was not tested between groups. Spindler (2011), reported IKDC score as a significant predictor of activity level after 6 years (no effect size reported; P=0.03), but the difference did not reach a clinically meaningful difference. Based on these three studies, De Valk (2013) concluded that patients aged younger than 30 years had higher activity levels after ACL reconstruction compared to older patients. In the systematic review of An (2013) 4 high quality studies did not show a relationship between age and IKDC, KOOS or Lysholm scores, (Cox, 2014; Spindler, 2011; Rotterud, 2013; Salmon, 2006)). The prospective cohort study of Scherer (2016) showed that younger patients (≤30 yr) undergoing an ACL reconstruction had a better Lysholm score (mean 90.4; 95% CI 86.0 to 94.9) six months after surgery compared to older patients (>30 yr) (mean 84.8; 95% CI 79.7 to 89.9, P=0.03). Barenius (2012) registry study found a positive relation of a higher age and male sex with a good functional outcome (defined by the KOOS score>90 for Pain,>84 for Symptoms, >91 for ADL,>80 for Sport/Rec and >81 for QoL).

 

BMI: A low BMI was associated with a higher Marx activity level at 2-yr follow-up (OR 1.37; 5% CI 1.04 to 1.82; Dunn, 2010). A BMI within the normal range was also found to be associated with a higher KOOS quality of life score at 1-yr follow-up (no quantitative data reported; Heijne, 2009) and was associated with higher IKDC scores (no effect size reported; P=0.02) and KOOS sports and recreation scores after six years (no effect size reported; P=0.05; Spindler, 2011). A high BMI (>30 kg/m2) was associated with a lower success of surgery compared to normal BMI (OR 0.35; 95% CI 0.17 to 0.71; Kowalchuk, 2009). Based on these four studies, De Valk et al. (2013) concluded that patients with a high baseline BMI (id est pre-surgery) perform worse in rehabilitation and consequently have lower activity levels after ACL reconstruction compared to patients with a normal BMI.

 

Smoking: Smoking within six months before surgery was associated with lower Marx activity level 2 years after ACL reconstruction (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.33 to 0.92; Dunn, 2010). Smokers had a lower chance of success of the surgery compared to non-smokers (OR 0.34; 95% CI 0.15 to 0.76; Kowalchuk, 2009). Smoking resulted in worse mean IKDC scores and overall knee function after reconstruction (no effect size reported; P=0.002; Karim, 2006). Smoking was also a significant predictor of worse IKDC score after 6 yr (no effect size reported; P=0.05; Spindler, 2011). Therefore, based on these four studies, De Valk (2013) concluded that smoking resulted in lower activity levels, lower subjective IKDC scores and lower KOOS scores after ACL reconstruction.

 

Patient psychological factors: One study included in the systematic review by Everhart. (Thomee, 1995) found that perceived self-efficacy at completing knee-related tasks in the future (K-SES-future) was predictive of higher KOOS scores (sport-recreation OR 1.6, P=0.002; quality of life OR 1.5, P=0.037) and a better Tegner activity score (OR 1.7, P=0.003). Another included study (Swirtun, 2008) found that patients with high optimism had higher KOOS scores at 5-year follow-up (Spearman’s rho = -0.36; P<0.05).

 

2. Return to sport

Patient psychological factors: Everhart (2015) reported that those with a higher motivation to return to sport actually more often return to sport after 12 months (returners: median 16 points, IQR 14-18; non-returners: median 9 points, IQR 8-15; P<0.001) (Everhart, 2015).

 

3. Graft failure

Gender, BMI: Gender and BMI seem to have no effect on graft failure (An, 2016). This is supported by the results of Barenius (2013), defining graft failure by KOOS Quality of life score <44. No significant association was found for gender (males RR 0.98; NS). In the study of Kaeding (2014), also no statistically significant difference was found for gender (females OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.50 to 1.25).

 

Age: Based on three studies, An (2016) concluded that younger patients had higher risk of graft failure compared to older patients (Persson, 2014; Wasserstein, 2013; Kaeding, 2011). This is supported by the results of Kamien (2015), whereby younger patients (≤25 yr) also had a higher failure rate (25%) compared to the older age group (>25 yr 6%; P=0.009). In the study of Barenius (2013), younger patients had a higher risk to failure treatment (KOOS QoL score <44). The RR was 1.09 (95% CI not reported) in patients <18 yr, 1.10 in patients 18 to 34 yr, 0.81 in patients 35 to 54 yr and 0.71 in patients >55 yr (P=0.003). The study of Kaeding (2014) showed that the odds of re-tear decreased by 9% for each year increase in age and increased by 11% for each increase of a point on the Marx activity scale.

 

4. Revision surgery

Gender, BMI, smoking: No significant association was found for gender, BMI and smoking with revision surgery in the study of Andernord (2015), and for gender and BMI in the study of Yabroudi (2016).

 

Age: In the study of Yabroudi (2016), younger patient had an increased risk for revision ACL surgery, with an OR of 9.52 (95% CI 2.05 to 44.26; P=0.004) in the age group ≤18 yr (n=78) and an OR of 9.87 (95% CI 2.02 to 48.22; P=0.004) in the age group 19 to 23 yr (n=55), compared to the age group ≥24 yr (N=118). In the study of Magnussen (2012) younger patients (<20 yr) also had an increased risk to have revision ACL reconstruction within the study period of 3-yr, with an OR of 18.97 (95% BI 2.43 to 147.06; P=0.005). In the study of Ponce (2015), age was statistically significantly associated with revision surgery in a multivariable analysis accounting for age, sport type and surgeon, whereby the risk on revision surgery was higher in younger patients (OR per year 0.938; 95% CI 0.891 to 0.987).

 

Operative parameters

The results of Yabroudin (2016) results showed that reconstruction performed with allograft was an independent predictor of ACL reconstruction. Magnussen (2012) found that use of hamstring autografts 8 mm in diameter or less in patients aged <20 years. Kaeding (2014) found meniscal status had no effect on the risk of graft re-tear. Barenius (2013) stated that the major finding of this study was that a medial meniscus injury requiring surgery had a high impact on outcome 2 years after ACL reconstructions. One of the strongest negative predictors for functional recovery (FR) was notchplasty. Twenty-eight per cent had a notchplasty and only 16 % of these were in FR after 2 years. Ponce (2015) found surgeon-dependent variation in outcome (revision) but could not explain this reason. In this study, a failed ACL reconstruction, defined as recurrent instability, is more common when surgery is associated with medial or lateral meniscal deficiency.

 

ACL reconstruction versus conservative treatment

Eitzen (2010) investigated prognostic factors influencing success of conservative treatment versus ACL reconstruction. A high level of activity (I out of IV) according to the Marx Activity Rating Scale Marx, (2001) was a significant predictor for undergoing a delayed ACL reconstruction compared to those with a lower (activity level II-IV) (RR 2.01; 95% CI 1.28 to 3.15). Those who later had surgical reconstruction were also significantly younger (24.4 yr, SD 7.0) compared to those treated non-surgically (27.9 yr, SD 8.9), with a mean difference of 3.5 years (95% CI -6.12 to -0.88).

 

Table 1 Summary of most important results

Predictors

Reference

Outcome

Measure

Effect size

Demographics

Gender (male)

An, 2016 (Spindler, 2011; Persson, 2014; Rotterud, 2013; Dunn, 2010; Wasserstein, 2013)

1. PROMS

 

IKDC, KOOS

No effect

 

De Valk, 2013

(Ahlden, 2013; Dunn, 2010; Salmon, 2006)

 

Functional outcomes

Standardized mean difference 0.28 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.51).

 

 

An, 2016 (Spindler, 2011; Persson, 2014; Rotterud, 2013; Dunn, 2010; Wasserstein, 2013); Andernord, 2015; Robb, 2015; Kaeding, 2014

3. Failure of treatment

 

Graft failure

No effect

Age (young)

An, 2016 (Cox, 2014; Rotterud, 2013; Spindler, 2011; Salmon, 2006)

1. PROMS

 

IKDC, KOOS

No effect

 

Scherer, 2016

 

Lysholm

Age≤30 yr: mean 90.4 (95% CI 86.0 to 94.9)

Age>30 yr: mean 84.8 (95% CI 79.7 to 89.9), P=0.027

 

De Valk, 2014 (Osti, 2011; Brandsson, 2000; Spindler, 2011)

 

Activity level

Brandsson, 2000

Age 22-24 yr: Tegner activity level 5 (range 3-9)

Age >40 yr: Tegner 6 (range 1-9), P=0.032

 

Osti, 2011

Age<30 yr: IKDC 92 (range 80-100)

Age>50 yr: IKDC 91 (range 80-100)

 

Spindler, 2011

No clinically significant difference

 

An, 2016 (Persson, 2014; Wasserstein, 2013; Kaeding, 2011)

3. Failure of treatment

 

Graft failure

Increased risk: HR 2.1 to 2.3

 

Kaeding, 2014

 

Graft failure (ipsilateral)

Age (1 yr-increase) OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.94)

 

 

 

Graft failure (contralateral)

Age (1 yr-increase) OR 0.96 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.99)

 

Magnussen, 2012

 

Revision surgery

Age <20 yr: OR 18.97 (2.43 to 147.06)

 

Yabroudi, 2016

 

Revision surgery

≤18 yr: OR 9.52 (2.05 to 44.26)

19-23 yr: OR 9.87 (2.02 to 48.22)

BMI (high)

An, 2016 (Cox, 2014; Spindler, 2011)

1. PROMS

 

IKDC, KOOS

Worse

 

De Valk, 2013 (Spindler, 2011; Dunn, 2010; Heijne, 2009; Kowalchuk, 2009)

 

IKDC (activity level)

OR 1.37 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.82, P=0.027) (Dunn, 2010)

 

An, 2016 (Kaeding, 2011); Andernord, 2015; Robb, 2015

3. Failure of treatment

 

Graft failure

No effect

Smoking

An, 2016 (Spindler, 2011); Valk, 2013 (Dunn, 2010; Kowalchuk, 2009; Karim, 2006; Spindler, 2011)

 

1. PROMS

IKDC

OR 0.55 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.92, P=0.023) (Dunn, 2010)

 

De Valk (Spindler, 2011; Karim, 2006)

1. PROMS

IKDC, KOOS

lower

 

De Valk (Spindler, 2011; Dunn, 2010; Karim, 2006; Kowalchuk, 2009)

 

Activity level

OR 0.55 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.92, P=0.023)

Patient characteristics

Psychological factors

Everhart, 2015 (Thomée, 1995; Swirtun, 2008)

1. PROMS

KOOS, Tegner activity

KOOS Sport-recreation: OR 1.6, P=0.002

KOOS QoL: OR 1.5, P=0.037

Tegner activity score: OR 1.7, P=0.003 (Thomée, 1995)

 

Everhart, 2015 (Gobbi, 2006)

2. Return to sport

 

Returners: median 16 points, IQR 14-18

Nonreturners: median 9 points, IQR 8-15. P<0.001)

Preoperative knee function

Strength

 

De Valk (Heijne, 2009; Eitzen, 2009)

1. PROMS

Functional outcome: Cincinnati Knee Score, KOOS QoL

Quadriceps strength deficits >20% and low preoperative eccentric quadriceps torques lead to lower Cincinnati Knee Score and KOOS QoL score

Preoperative activity level

 

De Valk (Dunn, 2010; Kowalchuk, 2009)

1. PROMS

Marx activity level

IKDC

 

Controversial

Marx activity level: OR for 2-yr activity level 3.84 (95% CI 1.98 to 7.42) (Dunn, 2010)

IKDC: No quantitative data reported of publication Kowalchuk (2009):

IKDC, International Knee Documentation Committee; KOOS QoL, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; PROMS, patient reported outcomes measures

 

Level of evidence

PROMs: The level of evidence for the outcomes PROMs was downgraded by two levels, because of the risk of bias (no adjustments for important prognostic characteristics, -1) and indirectness (no information on the possible success of an ACL reconstruction in patients who did not qualify for a reconstruction, -1). For the predictor age, the outcome PROMs was downgraded by one extra level, because of inconsistency (conflicting results).

 

Return to sport: The level of evidence of the outcome return to sport was downgraded by three levels because of the risk of bias (incomplete accounting of patients and outcome events; -1); indirectness (no information on the possible success of an ACL reconstruction in patients who did not qualify for a reconstruction, -1) and the limited number of patients (imprecision; -1).

 

Failure of treatment: The level of evidence of the outcome failure of treatment was downgraded by two levels because of the risk of bias (no adjustments for important prognostic characteristics, -1), and indirectness (no information on the possible success of an ACL reconstruction in patients who did not qualify for a reconstruction, -1).

 

Conservative treatment: The level of evidence of the outcome conservative treatment was downgraded by three levels because of the risk of bias (incomplete accounting of patients and outcome events, no adjustments for important prognostic characteristics, -2) and the limited number of patients (imprecision; -1).

Zoeken en selecteren

A systematic review of the literature was performed to answer the following question:

Which predictors can be identified for the success or failure of ACL reconstruction?

 

P: patients with ACL injury;

I: presence of prognostic factors;

C: absence of prognostic factors;

O: success of treatment: PROMs, return to sport; failure of treatment: graft failure, pain, revision surgery.

The underlying question (indication) is a therapeutic question, the decision for an operation or conservative treatment is made based on several pre-operative findings and patient characteristics and preferences. To answer the question, the most important prognostic factors that determine the treatment success or failure of an ACL reconstruction should be mapped.

 

Relevant outcome measures

The working group did not define the outcome measures (treatment success or failure) a priori, but applied the definition used in the studies.

 

The working group did no define clinical (patient) relevant differences a priori.

 

Search and select (Methods)

The databases Medline (via OVID) and Embase (via Embase.com) were searched with relevant search terms. For the update, the database Medline was searched from the previous search till April 2017. The detailed search strategy is depicted under the tab Methods. The updated systematic literature search resulted in 542 hits. Studies were selected based on the following criteria:

  • Systematic review (searched in at least two databases with an objective and transparent search strategy, data extraction and risk of bias assessment) or
  • Randomised controlled trials or other comparison studies into different strategies for ACL reconstruction indication.
  • Comparison of different indication strategies or prognostic factors of treatment success/failure of ACL reconstruction.

Initially, 199 studies were selected based on title and abstract. After reading the full text, 186 studies were excluded (see the table with reasons for exclusion under the tab Methods) and thirteen studies were included in the literature analysis.

 

Thirteen studies were included in the literature review. The evidence tables and quality assessments from these studies are presented in the appendix of this chapter.

 

No RCTs or other comparative studies were found that investigated different strategies for indication. Three systematic reviews, four cohort studies and two case-control studies were found that investigated the association between pre-operative patient characteristics and the success of a primary ACL reconstruction. These studies were performed in patients who consulted an orthopaedic surgeon and were diagnosed with ACL injury and who underwent ACL reconstructon. As these studies do not provide information on the possible success of an ACL reconstruction in patients who did not qualify for a reconstruction as judged by the orthopaedic surgeon, a complete picture of the quality of the indication cannot be obtained (indirectness, see evidence of literature). Understanding the prognosis after ACL reconstruction and predictors of treatment success may also provide the basis for good patient information and management of expectations.

Referenties

  1. An VV, Scholes C, Mhaskar VA, et al. Limitations in predicting outcome following primary ACL reconstruction with single-bundle hamstring autograft - A systematic review. Knee. 2017;24(2):170-8.
  2. Andernord D, Desai N, Bjornsson H, et al. Patient predictors of early revision surgery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a cohort study of 16,930 patients with 2-year follow-up. Am J Sports Med. 2015;43(1):121-7.
  3. Barenius B, Forssblad M, Engstrom B, et al. Functional recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, a study of health-related quality of life based on the Swedish National Knee Ligament Register. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2013;21(4):914-27.
  4. Chalmers PN, Mall NA, Moric M, et al. Does ACL reconstruction alter natural history?: A systematic literature review of long-term outcomes. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2014;96(4):292-300.
  5. de Valk EJ, Moen MH, Winters M, et al. Preoperative patient and injury factors of successful rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with single-bundle techniques. Arthroscopy. 2013;29(11):1879-95.
  6. Eitzen I, Moksnes H, Snyder-Mackler L, et al. Functional tests should be accentuated more in the decision for ACL reconstruction. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2010;18(11):1517-25.
  7. Everhart JS, Best TM, Flanigan DC. Psychological predictors of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes: a systematic review. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2015;23(3):752-62.
  8. Kaeding CC, Pedroza A, Reinke E, et al. Risk Factors and Predictors Of Subsequent ACL Injury After ACL Reconstruction: Prospective Analysis Of 2801 Primary ACL Reconstructions. Orthop. 2014;2.
  9. Kamien PM, Hydrick JM, Replogle WH, et al. Age, graft size, and Tegner activity level as predictors of failure in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring autograft. Am J Sports Med. 2013;41(8):1808-12.
  10. Magnussen RA, Lawrence JT, West RL, et al. Graft size and patient age are predictors of early revision after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring autograft. Arthroscopy. 2012;28(4):526-31.
  11. Marx RG, Stump TJ, Jones EC, et al. Development and evaluation of an activity rating scale for disorders of the knee. Am J Sports Med. 2001 Mar-Apr;29(2):213-8. PubMed PMID: 11292048.
  12. Meuffels DE, Favejee MM, Vissers MM, et al. Ten year follow-up study comparing conservative versus operative treatment of anterior cruciate ligament ruptures. A matched-pair analysis of high level athletes. BJSM online. 2009;43(5):347-51.
  13. Monk AP, Davies LJ, Hopewell S, et al. Surgical versus conservative interventions for treating anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016;4:CD011166.
  14. Moksnes H, Risberg MA. Performance-based functional evaluation of non-operative and operative treatment after anterior cruciate ligament injury. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009;19(3):345-55.
  15. Ponce BA, Cain EL, Jr., Pflugner R, et al. Risk Factors for Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. J Knee Surg. 2016;29(4):329-36.
  16. Robb C, Kempshall P, Getgood A, et al. Meniscal integrity predicts laxity of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2015;23(12):3683-90.
  17. Scherer JE, Moen MH, Weir A, et al. Factors associated with a more rapid recovery after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using multivariate analysis. Knee. 2016;23(1):121-6.
  18. Stewart BA, Momaya AM, Silverstein MD, et al. The Cost-Effectiveness of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Competitive Athletes. Am J Sports Med. 2017 Jan;45(1):23-33. doi: 10.1177/0363546516664719. Epub 2016 Sep 30.
  19. Yabroudi MA, Bjornsson H, Lynch AD, et al. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction. Orthop. 2016;4(9):2325967116666039.

Evidence tabellen

Evidence table for prognostic studies

Study reference

Study characteristics

Patient characteristics

Prognostic factor(s)

Follow-up

 

Outcome measures and effect size

Comments

An, 2016

SR of prognostic studies

 

Literature search up to June 2015

 

A: Persson, 2014

B: Rotterud, 2013

C: Ageberg, 2010

D: Salmon, 2006

E: Wasserstein, 2013

F: Bailal, 2013

G: Cox, 2014

H: Rotterud, 2012

I: Salmon, 2015

J: Spindler, 2011

K: Borchers, 2009

L: Dunn, 2010

M: Kaeding, 2011

N: Mariscalco, 2013

 

Study design: not reported

 

Setting and Country:

Not reported

 

Source of funding:

Not reported

 

Inclusion criteria SR: ≥1 predictor on PROM, used standardized PROMs, follow-up ≥2 yr, English, (meta-analysis of) original data, ACLR performed with hamstring autograft and anteromedial portal with independent femoral tunnel

 

Extra inclusion criteria: Downs and Black score above the mean.

 

14 studies included in final analysis

 

N (mean age and sex not reported)

A: 12.643 patients

B: 8476 patients

C: 4438 patients

D: 743 patients

E: 378 patients

F: 92 patients

G: 1307 patients

H: 89 patients

I: 743 patients

J: 378 patients

K: 63 patients

L: 393 patients

M: 281 patients

N: 263 patients

A: sex, graft type, age

B: sex, age, previous knee surgery, time to surgery, graft type

C: sex

D: sex

E: sex, age, graft type, fixation method, income, length of stay, concurrent repairs, academic hospital status, surgeon volume

F: BMI

G: sex, age, BMI, meniscal tears, ligament tears, meniscal repairs, smoking, education level

H: concomitant full-thickness tears

I: mechanism of injury, IKDC baseline, sex, graft type, family history, articular surface damage, meniscal injury, meniscal repair

J: baseline PROM’s, sex, age, BMI, smoking, ethnicity, marital status, reconstruction type, ACL graft type, pop at time of injury, ligament injury, meniscal injury, cartilage injury

K: activity level, graft type

L: sex

M: age, sex, activity level, meniscus status, primary versus revision, BMI, graft type,

N: age, sex, graft size, graft type, operative side, surgeon, BMI, femoral tunnel drilling, baseline PROM’s

 

Endpoint of follow-up: not reported

 

Completeness of outcome data not reported

 

A: graft failure

B: KOOS

C: KOOS (change), IKDC, Lysholm

D: IKDC, Lysholm

E: graft failure

F: KOOS, Lysholm

G: IKDC, KOOS

H: KOOS (change)

I: graft failure

J: IKDC, KOOS

K: graft failure

L: KOOS, IKDC

M: graft failure

N: KOOS, IKDC

 

1. PROMS (IKDC, KOOS, Lysholm)

  • Age: no significant relationship; B, G, I, J
  • BMI (increased): worse; G, J; no significant relationship: F
  • Smoking: worse; J

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Graft failure

  • Age (younger): increased risk (HR 2.1-2.3); A, E, M
  • Sex (female): no significant relationship; A, B, E, J, M
  • BMI: no significant relationship: F
  • Activity (higher level): more failure; K; no significant relationship; M

 

4. Revision surgery

 

Quality assessment: only studies scoring above the mean Downs and Black (18.3 from 26) were considered “higher quality” and included in the further analysis.

 

For most of the outcomes, no effect sizes were reported.

De Valk, 2013

SR and meta-analysis of cohort studies

 

Literature search up to February 2013

 

A: Ahldén, 2012

B: Ahlén, 2011

C: Barber-Westin, 1997

D: Brandsson, 2000

E: Dunn, 2010

F: Eitzen, 2009

G: Hamada, 2000

H: Heijne, 2009

I: Karim, 2006

J: Karlsson, 1999

K: Kim, 2011

L: Kowalchuk, 2009

M: Melikoglu, 2008

N: Osti, 2011

O: Raviraj, 2010

P: Salmon, 2006

Q: Spindler, 2011

R: Sterett, 2003

 

Study design: 1 RCT, 8 prospective, 9 retrospective

 

Setting and Country:

Not reported

 

Source of funding:

Not reported

 

Inclusion criteria SR:

Extra inclusion criteria: Newcastle-Ottowa Scale score ≥7 (from 9)

 

18 studies included in final analysis

 

N, mean age, sex

A: 244 patients, 29 and 26 yr, 58% male

B: 61 patients, 26 and 27 yr, 56% male

C: 94 patients, 14-54 yr, 50% male

D: 67 patients, 43 and 23 yr, 67% male

E: 393 patients, 23 yr, 56% male

F: 73 patients, 30 and 27 yr, 64% male

G: 86 patients, 24/25/22 yr, 50% male

H: 64 patients, 30 yr, 55% male

I: 304 patients, 32 and 33 yr, 42% male

J: 200 patients, 22 and 24 yr, 65% male

K: 113 patients, 28 yr, 63% male

L: 402 patients, 28 yr, 52% male

M: 98 patients, 32/25/35 yr, 87% male

N: 40 patients, 56 and 27 yr, 60% male

O: 99 patients, 31 yr, 52% male

P: 200 patients, 50% male

Q: 375 patients, 28 and 25 yr, 54% male

R: 160 patients, 28 and 31 yr, 53% male

A: sex

B: time to surgery

C: sex

D: age

E: sex, BMI, smoking, preinjury Marx level

F: meniscus injury, SF-36 BP subscore, VAS global function, triple-hop test, quadricepts strength, stair-hop test

G: preoperative knee joint laxity

H: sex, BMI, anterior knee laxity, quadriceps torque, graft, time to surgery, IKDC

I: smoking

J: time to surgery

K: posterolateral laxity

L: BMI, occupation, smoking, education level, marital status, activity level, mechanism of injury, surgical variables

M: time to surgery

N: age

O: time to surgery

P: sex

Q: age, BMI, sex, smoking, ethnicity, marital status, graft type

R: time to surgery

 

Endpoint of follow-up:

A: 25 months

B: 2 yr

C: 26 months

D: 31 months

E: 2 yr

F: 2 yr

G: 2 yr

H: 1 yr

I: 6 yr

J: 2-5.5 yr

K: 2 yr

L: 6.3 yr

M: 1 yr

N: 2 yr

O: 32 months

P: 7 yr

Q: 6 yr

R: Sterett, 2003

 

Completeness of outcome data not reported

 

 

A: KT-1000, Lachman, ROM, one-leg hop test, Lysholm, Tegner

B: KT-1000, Lachman, ROM, one-leg hop test, Lysholm, Tegner, kneeling ability

C: KT-2000, quadriceps and hamstring, knee examination, subjective questionnaire

D: IKDC, Lysholm, Tegner, pain, knee-walking ability, KT-1000, one-leg hop test, ROM

E: Marx activity level, KOOS, IKDC

F: Cincinnati Knee Score

G: IKDC, Knee laxity tester, flexion and extension peak torques

H: KOOS, one-leg hop test, Tegner

I: IKDC, laxity

J: Lysholm, Tegner, IKDC, KT-1000, Knee-waling, ROM, onle-leg hop test

K: Lachman, pivot shift, KT-2000, Lysholm, IKDC

L: quadriceps strength, hamstring strength, isokinetic data, KT-1000

M: graft failure

N: Lachman, pivot shift, KT-1000, Lysholm, IKDC

O: Lysholm, Tegner, ROM, clinical examination, KT-1000

P: Lachman, pivot shift, KT-1000, IKDC, one-leg hop, kneeling pain, ROM

Q: KOOS, IKDC, Marx Activity Scale

R: ROM

 

1. PROMS

Defined as activity level

  • Sex (male): standardized mean difference 0.28 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.51), P=0.02; E, P, Q
  • Age (young, 20-24): higher Tegner activity level (P=0.032) compared to age >40 yr; D
  • BMI (low): OR 1.37 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.82), P=0.027

Defined as KOOS

  • BMI (low): R2=0.08

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Graft failure

Not reported

 

4. Revision surgery

Not reported

 

Everhart, 2015

SR of prospective cohort studies

 

Literature search up to June 2012

 

A: Brewer, 2000

B: Brewer2003

C: Chmielewski, 2011

D: Gobbi, 2006

E: Langford, 2009

F: Scherzer, 2001

G: Swirtun, 2008

H: Thomeé, 2008

 

Study design: prospective

 

Setting and Country:

Not reported

 

Source of funding:

Not reported

 

Inclusion criteria SR:

ACL reconstruction outcomes, physically active participants, mean age 13 till 65 year, prospective study design, predictive assessment of psychological factors as injury risk factor was primary or secondary aim, peer-reviewed publication, English.

 

8 studies included

 

N, mean age, sex

A: 95 patients, 27 yr, 71% male

B: 61 patients, 26 yr, 66% male

C: 77 patients, 22 yr, 53% male

D: 100 patients, 28 yr yr, 67% male

E: 87 patients, 28 yr, 63% male

F: 54 patients, 28 yr, 69% male

G: 57 patients, 32 yr

 

A: AIMS, BSI, SMI, SSI

B: AIMS, BSI, SMI, SSI

C: knee symptoms (IKDC, pain-NRS)

D: knee symptoms (IKDC, SANE) activity levels (Tegner, Marx activity scale), motivation to return to sport

E: ERAIQ, ACL-RSI

F: SIS

G: personality traits and activity level (Tegner)

H: activity level (Tegner) and self-efficacy

 

 

 

Endpoint of follow-up:

A: 6 months

B: 6 months

C: 3 months

D: 12 months

E: 12 months

F: 6 months

G: 60 months

H: 12 months

 

Completeness of outcome data not reported

 

 

A: rehabilitation effort (SIRAS), compliance, laxity, 1-leg hop distance, Tegner

B: rehabilitation effort (SIRAS), compliance

C: knee symptoms (NRS, IKDC)

D: knee strength, knee motion analysis, return to sport

E: knee strength, laxity, Lachman, pivot shift, range of motion, effusion, hop performance

F: rehabilitation effort (SIRAS) and compliance

G: knee symptoms (knee injury and KOOS), Tegner

H: Tegner, physical activity scale, KOOS, Lysholm, onl-leg hop test

 

1. PROMS

Defined by KOOS Sport-recreation: H

OR 1.6; P=0.002

Defined by KOOS QoL: H

OR 1.5; P=0.037

Defined by Tegner activity score: H

OR 1.7; P=0.003 (Thomée, 1995)

 

2. Return to sport

- Psychovitality score: D

Returners: median 16 points, IQR 14-18

Nonreturners: median 9 points, IQR 8-15; P<0.001)

 

3. Graft failure

Not reported

 

4. Revision surgery

Not reported

Mean modified Coleman

score 63 ± 5 out of 90, with a range of 55 till 72.

 

ACL-RSI = motivation to return to sport

AIMS = athletic identity

BSI = stress

ERAIQ = distress due to athletic injury

SIS = positive coping skills during rehabilitation

SMI = self-motivation

SSI = social support

 

 

Study reference

Study characteristics

Patient characteristics

Prognostic factor(s)

Follow-up

 

Outcome measures and effect size

Comments

Andernord, 2015

Type of study: cohort study

 

Setting: patients who underwent primary hamstring tendon or BPTB autografts ACLR

 

Country: Sweden

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: primary ACLR (2005 till 2011) and registered for revision surgery (2005 till 2013), age 13-59, HT autograft of BPTB autograft.

 

Exclusion criteria: patients without exact dates of reconstruction or revision.

 

N=16.930

 

Mean age±SD: males 27.9±9.1 yr; females 25.4±10.3 yr.

 

Sex: 58% males

Activity at the time of ACL injury

Sex

Age

Body height

Body weight

BMI

cigarette smoking

Use of smokeless tobacco

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 24 months

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as revision surgery:

Activity at the time of ACL injury (soccer): Relative Risk (95% CI)

Males: RR 1.58 (1.12 to 2.23), P=0.009

Females: RR 1.43 (1.01 to 2.04), P=0.045

 

Sex: Relative Risk (95% CI)

Males RR 0.91 (0.71 to 1.16)

Females RR 1.10 (0.86 to 1.40), P=0.448

 

Age 13-19 yr: Relative Risk (95% CI)

Males: RR 2.67 (1.91 to 3.73), P<0.001

Females: RR 2.25 (1.57 to 3.24), P<0.001

Age ≥30 yr: Relative Risk R (95% CI)

Males: RR 0.31 (0.20 to 0.49), P<0.001

Females: RR 0.37 (0.22 to 0.62), P<0.001

 

BMI: no association

 

Cigarette smoking: no association

ACLR = anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Barenius, 2013

Type of study: retrospective cohort study

 

Setting: Swedish national knee ligament register

 

Country: Sweden

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: 2005-2008 cohort, complete KOOS

 

Exclusion criteria: patients with a revision ACL reconstruction, patients with multi-ligament injuries requiring surgical intervention in excess of ACL reconstruction, patients with a posterior

cruciate ligament injuries, patients with a later contra lateral ACL reconstruction and patients without a specified injury date

 

N=3.556 patients

 

Age

<18 yr: 21%

18-34 yr: 55%

35-54 yr: 23%

>55: 1%

 

Sex: 51% males

Sex

Age

Previous surgery

Injury at reconstruction

Procedure specific

 

 

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 2 year

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

1. PROMS

KOOS (used to define failure of treatment)

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Defined by KOOS QoL score < 44

 

Sex: Relative Risk

Males: RR 0.98, NS

 

Age: Relative Risk

<18 yr: RR 1.09

18-34 yr: RR 1.10

35-54 yr: RR 0.81

>55: RR 0.71, P=0.003

KOOS = Knee Osteoarthritis

Outcome Score

Eitzen, 2010

Type of study: prospective cohort study

 

Setting: patients visiting outpatient clinic from 2003-2008 with complete unilateral

rupture of the ACL

 

Country: Norway

 

Source of funding: non-commercial

Inclusion criteria: complete unilateral

rupture of the ACL within the past three months, a minimum 3 mm side-to-side difference in knee joint laxity using the KT-1000

knee arthrometer, age 13-60 yr, regular participation in pivoting sports at level I or II (criteria Hefti et al).

 

Exclusion criteria: concomitant grade III-IV injury to other ligaments in the index knee, previous injury to

the index- or contralateral knee, cartilage lesions affecting subchondral bone, fractures,

symptomatic meniscal injury or inability to meet the compliance requirements for

participation.

 

N=145 patients

 

Mean age (range): 25.9 (14 till 47) yr

 

Sex: 48% males

Sex

Age

Activity level

Give-way episodes

 

Endpoint of follow-up: not reported

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

ACL reconstruction

Sex: Relative Risk (95% CI)

Males: RR 1.16 (0.85 to 0.60)

 

Age: Mean age (SD):

Reconstruction: 27.9 (8.9) 71

Conservative: 24.4 (7.0) 74

Md: -3.5 (95% CI -6.12 to -0.88)

 

Activity level: Relative Risk (95% CI) Level I/II: RR 2.01 (1.28 to 3.15)

 

Give-way: Relative Risk (95% CI)

>1 give-way episode (yes/no)

0.96 (0.67 to 1.37)

 

 

Kaeding, 2014

Type of study: cohort study

 

Setting: data of the MOON cohort database (2002-2008) were used, subjects with primary ACLR

 

Country: Sweden

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: Subjects who had a primary ACLR with no history of contralateral knee surgery with 2-year follow-up data.

 

Exclusion criteria: Subjects who underwent a multiligament reconstruction or had a hybrid autograft + allograft ACLR

 

N=2683

 

Mean age±SD: 27±11 yr

 

Sex: 56% male

Age

Sex

BMI

Smoking status

Marx activity score

Graft type

Full thickness lateral meniscus tear at the time of ACLR

Full thickness medial meniscus tear at the time of ACLR

Consortium site

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 24 months

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available?

N (%):

 

Reasons for incomplete outcome data described? Yes

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as Ipsilateral ACL retear

 

Age: OR 0.91 (95% CI 0.87 to 0.94)

Marx activity score: OR 1.11 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.20)

Sex (female): OR 0.79 (95% CI 0.50 to 1.25)

 

Reported as Contralateral ACL retear

 

Age: OR 0.96 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.99)

Marx activity score: OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.22)

Sex (female): OR 1.52 (95% CI 0.91 to 2.54)

 

Kamien, 2013

Type of study: cohort study

 

Setting: patients who underwent primary,

quadruple-looped hamstring tendon ACLR

 

Country: USA

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: 24 months follow-up, acute injuries (<3 months from the date of surgery), chronic injuries (>3 months from the date of surgery), both contact and noncontact injuries.

 

Exclusion criteria: bilateral ACL injury, previous ligament surgery, associated ligament injuries.

 

N=98

 

Mean age: 16.99 yr

 

Sex: not reported

Tegner activity level

Graft size

Age

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 2 year

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available?

N (%): 195 (7.3%)

 

Reasons for incomplete outcome data described?

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as failure rate

 

Age: %

Age ≤25 yr: 25%

Age >25 yr: 6% (P=0.009)

ACLR = anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

Magnussen, 2012

Type of study: retrospective cohort study

 

Setting: consecutive isolated ACL reconstructions

 

Country: USA

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: isolated ACL reconstructions between January 1 2006 and December 31 2009, minimum 6 months follow-up

 

Exclusion criteria: Revision ACL reconstructions and ACL reconstructions performed with grafts

other than hamstring tendon autograft.

 

N=256

 

Mean age±SD: 25.0±10.5 yr

 

Sex: 53% male

Age

Gender

Graft size

 

Mean follow-up: 14 months (range 6 to 47, SD 8 months)

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as revision ACL reconstruction

 

Age: OR (95% CI)

Age <20 yr: OR 18.97 (2.43 to 147.06), P=0.005

 

 

Ponce, 2015

Type of study: retrospective case-control study

 

Setting: data collected within the American Sports Medicine Institute, from patients who underwent only primary or also revision ACL reconstruction

 

Country: USA

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: surgeries performed by 1 of 6 sports medicine fellowship-trained surgeons between September 2001 and December 2008.

 

N=2965

Revision: n=67 (2.3%)

Nonrevision: n=2898

 

Mean age: 25.7 yr

 

Sex: 65% male

Age (at time of surgery)

Sport

Surgeon

Level of participation

 

Endpoint of follow-up: maximum 7 year

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as revision ACL surgery:

 

Age: OR (95% CI)a

OR 0.938 (0.891 to 0.987), P=0.014

aMultivariable analysis with age, sport and surgeon

bMultivariable analysis with age, level of participation and surgeon

 

Robb, 2015

Type of study: prospective cohort study

 

Setting: patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between 2009 and 2011

 

Country: Canada

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: all patients undergoing an elective ACL under the care of the two lead

surgeons at our institution.

 

Exclusion criteria:

Not reading/writing,

multiligament knee injury, significant co-morbidity, ICRS

grade IIIB cartilage lesion >1 cm2 on >1 articular surface, age<16.

 

N=141

 

Mean age (range): 27 yr (16-65)

 

Sex: not reported

Time since ACL rupture

Age

Sex

BMI

Intact or deficient medial and lateral

Meniscus

Meniscal repair

Hamstring graft size, tripling and strand number.

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 2 years

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? N=16

 

 

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as graft failurea

 

Age: HR 0.97 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.0)

Male gender: HR 3.0 (0.7 to 13.1)

BMI: HR 0.98 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.2)

aGraft failure defined as: patient reported symptoms of rotational instability, a clinically positive pivot shift, MRI or arthroscopy showing ACL graft rupture.

S

Scherer, 2016

Type of study: prospective cohort study

 

Setting: patients who underwent ACL reconstruction between 2010 and 2012

 

Country: The Netherlands

 

Source of funding: not reported

Inclusion criteria: Patients who rehabilitated in clinic for physiotherapy, 95% of the preoperative variables available at 6 months, ACLR with single-bundle

technique and hamstring autograft

 

Exclusion criteria:

incomplete survey data (>5% data missing), other surgical technique, revision ACLR

 

N=118

 

Mean age±SD: 27.3±10.5 yr

 

Sex: 53% male

Sex

Age

Smoking status

BMI

Highest level of education

Time from injury until surgery Side of the injury

Knee surgery in medical

history

IKDC

ROM

KT-2000

Presence of chondral and meniscal injury

 

Endpoint of follow-up: 6 months

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

 

1. PROMS

Lysholm and KOOS (symptoms, sport/rec, QoL)

 

Age: Mean (95% CI)

Eta-squared Ƞ2 (=R2)

 

Lysholm score: Mean (95% CI):

Age≤30 yr: 90.4 (86.0 to 94.9)

Age>30 yr: 84.8 (79.7 to 89.9), P=0.027

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Not reported

 

 

Yabroudi, 2016

Type of study: case-control study

 

Setting: patients who underwent primary,

unilateral ACLR

 

Country: USA

 

Source of funding: non-commercial

Inclusion criteria: 14-50 yr at time of ACLR, subjects with concomitant meniscus, ligament or cartilage

injury

 

Exclusion criteria: Subjects who had prior injury or surgery to either knee

 

N=251

 

Mean age±SD: 26.1±9.9 yr

 

Sex: 45% male

Age (at time of surgery)

Time from injury to surgery

Sex

BMI

Preinjury activity level

Return to sport status

 

Mean follow-up ± SD: 3.4 ± 1.3 yr

 

For how many participants were no complete outcome data available? Not reported

 

1. PROMS

Not reported

 

2. Return to sport

Not reported

 

3. Failure of treatment

Reported as revision ACL surgery:

 

Age: OR (95% CI)

≤18 yr: OR 9.52 (2.05 to 44.26), P=0.004

19-23 yr: OR 9.87 (2.02 to 48.22) (P=0.005)

 

Sex: OR (95% CI)

Male: OR 1..34 (0.54 to 3.36), P=0.53

 

BMI: OR (95% CI)

OR 0.96 (0.86 to 1.07), P=0.43

Baseline activity level

ACLR = anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

 

Table of quality assessment – prognostic studies

(The criteria used in this checklist are adapted from: Altman DG (2001). Systematic reviews of evaluations of prognostic variables. In: Egger M, Smith GD, Altman DG (eds.). Systematic reviews in health care. London: BMJ Books; Laupacis A, Wells G, Richardson WS, Tugwell P (1994). Users' guides to the medical literature. How to use an article about prognosis. Evidence-Based Medicine Working Group. JAMA,272:234-7)

Study reference

 

(first author, year of publication)

Was there a representative and well-defined sample of patients at a similar point in the course of the disease?

 

(yes/no/unclear)

Was follow-up sufficiently long and complete?

 

 

(yes/no/unclear)

Was the outcome of interest defined and adequately measured?

 

(yes/no/unclear)

Was the prognostic factor of interest defined and adequately measured?

 

(yes/no/unclear)

Was loss to follow-up / incomplete outcome data described and acceptable?

 

(yes/no/unclear)

Was there statistical adjustment for all important prognostic factors?

 

 (yes/no/unclear)

Level of evidence

 

 

Andernord, 2015

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No (not described)

No

B

Barenius, 2013

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No (not described)

No

B

Eitzen, 2010

Yes

Unclear

Yes

No

No (not described)

No

B

Kaeding, 2014

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

A2

Kamien, 2013

No

Yes

Yes

No

No (not described)

No

B

Magnussen, 2012

Yes

No

Yes

No

No (not described)

No

B

Ponce, 2015

Yes

Unclear

Yes

Unclear

No (not described)

No

B

Robb, 2013

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

A2

Scherer, 2016

Yes

No

Yes

No

No (not described)

No

B

Yabroudi, 2016

Yes

Yes

No (self-report)

Yes

No (not described)

Yes

B

A1: Meta-analysis of at least 2 independent studies of level A2.

A2: Prospective inception cohort* (patients enrolled at same point in disease course), adequate study size and follow-up (≥80%), adequate control for confounding and no selective loss to follow-up.

B: Prospective cohort* but not fulfilling all criteria for category-A2, retrospective cohort study or, case-control study, or cross-sectional study.

C: non-comparative study.

 

* untreated controls from an RCT can also be considered as a cohort.

Overwegingen

De keuze tussen chirurgische en niet-chirurgische behandeling op basis van uitkomstscores is niet eenvoudig. Slechts één van de geïncludeerde studies (Eitzen, 2010) onderzocht de voorspellende waarde van patiëntkenmerken op de uitkomst door te evalueren welke kenmerken voorspellend waren voor het succesvol afronden van een niet-operatieve behandeling. Deze studie, met lage bewijkskracht, toonde aan dat jongere en meer actieve patiënten eerder de niet-operatieve behandeling afbraken en kozen voor VKB-reconstructie. Succesvolle afronding van de niet-chirurgische behandeling werd vaker gezien bij oudere en minder actieve patiënten. De uitkomsten van de behandeling werden echter niet meegenomen, waardoor niets kon worden geconcludeerd over de effectiviteit van deze behandelingskeuzes. Een recente Cochrane review (Monk, 2016) includeerde maar één enkele studie die het effect van VKB-reconstructie versus conservatieve behandeling onderzocht (N=141). Er werd geen verschil in PROMs gevonden na 2 en 5 jaar follow-up.

 

Activiteitenniveau en leeftijd

De associatie tussen preoperatief activiteitenniveau en het succes van de behandeling is nog steeds controversieel. Een tien jaar durende follow-up studie, waarin conservatieve behandeling werd vergeleken met operatieve behandeling onder zeer actieve patiënten, liet geen verschillen zien tussen de groepen in artrose, meniscusletsel, activiteitenniveau, en objectieve en subjectieve functionele uitkomsten Meuffels, (2009), hoewel operatief behandelde patiënten een significant betere stabiliteit van de knie hadden. Een andere studie onder 125 zeer actieve patiënten (gemiddelde leeftijd 27,2 ± 8,6 jaar, 1 jaar follow-up) tussen niet-geopereerde en wel-gereconstrueerde patiënten toonde alleen een significant verschil aan bij het uitvoeren van de vier enkelzijdige hop testen in het voordeel van de niet-geopereerde patiënten, maar er werden geen verschillen op de andere onderzochte testen: IKDC 2000 score, KOS-ADLS, KT-1000-knieartrometer, VAS, episodes van knie-instabiliteit en activiteitenniveau gevonden. Moksnes, (2009). Er zijn aanwijzingen dat een jongere leeftijd ten tijde van de reconstructie en een hoger activiteitenniveau, bijvoorbeeld contactsporten, gepaard gaan met een hogere kans op transplantaat falen en revisiechirurgie. Het lijkt redelijk dat patiënten die jonger zijn een andere en over het algemeen actievere levensstijl hebben na VKB-reconstructie in vergelijking met personen die 10 jaar of meer ouder zijn. De relatie tussen transplantaat falen en leeftijd moet ook in deze context worden gezien.

 

Er zijn aanwijzingen dat de leeftijd van de (volgroeide) patiënt een ondergeschikte rol speelt bij de indicatiestelling voor operatieve behandeling. Met andere woorden: oudere leeftijd is geen contra-indicatie.

 

Lange termijn

Langetermijnresultaten (>10 jaar) van VKB-reconstructie versus niet-operatieve behandeling zijn onderzocht in een systematische review van Chalmers (2014). Degenen die een VKB-reconstructie ondergingen, hadden in de vervolgperiode minder meniscusletsel, minder noodzaak tot verdere operaties en een significant grotere verbetering in activiteitenniveau gemeten met de Tegner score. Er waren geen significante verschillen in de Lysholm score, IKDC-score of in de ontwikkeling van radiografisch zichtbare artrose. Er zijn sterke aanwijzingen dat niet-chirurgische behandeling leidt tot meer kraakbeen en meniscusletsel en dientengevolge tot meer secundaire interventies. Ook blijkt dat patiënten met kraakbeen en meniscusletsel een hogere kans hebben op een slechte uitkomst van een VKB-reconstructie. Desalniettemin is er geen verschil aangetoond in het voorkomen van latere artrose van de knie tussen de gereconstrueerde en de niet-gereconstrueerde patiëntengroepen Chalmers (2014).

 

Maatschappelijk perspectief

Bij competitieve sporters zijn kosteneffectiviteit studies uitgevoerd in de USA Stewart, (2017). Door hen werd vastgesteld dat operatieve reconstructie kosteneffectief was ten opzichte van niet-operatieve behandeling bij competitieve sporters. Aangetekend moet worden dat de vergelijking tussen de inclusiegroepen en de verschillende maatschappelijke en zorgsystemen het moeilijk maken om deze uitkomsten direct naar de Nederlandse situatie te vertalen.

 

Patiëntenperspectief

Voor patiënten wordt de beslissing om VKB-reconstructie te ondergaan vaak beïnvloed door zijn of haar huidige leefstijl, peer group en activiteitenniveau. Omdat bij beide behandelingsopties een langdurig revalidatie protocol noodzakelijk is, heeft dit laatste geen effect op de keuze van de behandeling.

 

Het blijkt dat aanpassen van de levensstijl, door stoppen met roken en het verlagen van het gewicht tot een normale BMI, een positief effect heeft op de uitkomst van een reconstructie.

 

Bij professionele sporters en talentvolle aanstaande/potentiële topsporters gelden vanuit de sporter en zijn omgeving andere wensen en verwachtingen ten aanzien van de keuze tussen operatieve en conservatieve behandeling.

 

De werkgroep beseft zich terdege dat enerzijds hiermee de “high risk” patiënten met pivoterende kniebelasting worden bedoeld, maar dat daarbij ook andere, niet-medische motieven een rol kunnen spelen.

 

De conditie van de knie met betrekking tot kraakbeenschade kan de keuze voor operatieve behandeling beïnvloeden.

 

Voorlichting patiënt

Vanuit de patiënt en zijn of haar verwachtingspatroon kan de definitie van “een slecht resultaat” anders liggen dan de puur medisch-technische definitie. Een duidelijke voorlichting over het te verwachten activiteitenniveau, op kortere en langere termijn, is voor de besluitvorming van groot belang. Voor een hoog niveau sporter zijn de onzekerheid van een conservatieve behandeling moeilijker te accepteren dan voor een recreatieve sporter of een patiënt van oudere leeftijd. Deze onzekerheden kunnen ook een belangrijke factor zijn die ten aanzien van de werksituatie in de overwegingen moeten worden meegenomen. De consultkaart Voorstekruisbandletsel: Revalideren of Operatie met revalidatie is ontwikkeld als keuzehulp bij de behandelopties. Een duidelijk advies betreffende leefstijl, zowel wat betreft fitheid en overgewicht en wat betreft roken, is zowel voor operatief als niet-operatief te behandelen patiënten op zijn plaats: leefstijlaanpassingen, BMI-verlaging en stoppen met roken heeft een positief effect op de uitkomsten van de behandeling. Voor de interventies ter ondersteuning van stoppen met roken en verlagen van BMI wordt verwezen naar de CBO-richtlijnen Behandeling van Tabaksverslaving en Diagnostiek en Behandeling van obesitas.

 

Zie ook de consultkaart Voorstekruisbandletsel: Revalideren of Operatie met revalidatie: https://consultkaart.nl/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/FMS_ck_Voorstekruisbandletsel_2018.01.pdf

Autorisatiedatum en geldigheid

Laatst beoordeeld :

Laatst geautoriseerd :

Voor het beoordelen van de actualiteit van deze richtlijn is de werkgroep niet in stand gehouden. Uiterlijk in 2023 bepaalt het bestuur van de Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging of de modules van deze richtlijn nog actueel zijn. Op modulair niveau is een onderhoudsplan beschreven. Bij het opstellen van de richtlijn heeft de werkgroep per module een inschatting gemaakt over de maximale termijn waarop herbeoordeling moet plaatsvinden en eventuele aandachtspunten geformuleerd die van belang zijn bij een toekomstige herziening (update). De geldigheid van de richtlijn komt eerder te vervallen indien nieuwe ontwikkelingen aanleiding zijn een herzieningstraject te starten.

 

De Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging is regiehouder van deze richtlijn en eerstverantwoordelijke op het gebied van de actualiteitsbeoordeling van de richtlijn. De andere aan deze richtlijn deelnemende wetenschappelijke verenigingen of gebruikers van de richtlijn delen de verantwoordelijkheid en informeren de regiehouder over relevante ontwikkelingen binnen hun vakgebied.

Initiatief en autorisatie

Initiatief : Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging

Geautoriseerd door:
  • Koninklijk Nederlands Genootschap voor Fysiotherapie
  • Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging
  • Nederlandse Vereniging voor Heelkunde
  • Vereniging voor Sportgeneeskunde
  • Nederlandse Vereniging voor Arthroscopie

Algemene gegevens

De richtlijnontwikkeling werd ondersteund door het Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten (www.kennisinstituut.nl) en werd gefinancierd uit de Stichting Kwaliteitsgelden Medisch Specialisten (SKMS).

Doel en doelgroep

Doel

Deze richtlijn beoogt uniform beleid ten aanzien van de diagnostiek, indicatiestelling, behandeling en nazorg van patiënten met voorste kruisbandletsel.

 

Doelgroep

Deze richtlijn is geschreven voor alle leden van de beroepsgroepen die betrokken zijn bij de zorg voor patiënten met VKB-letsel, zoals, maar niet beperkend tot, orthopedisch chirurgen, fysiotherapeuten en andere professionals, zoals revalidatieartsen, chirurgen en sportartsen. Deze andere beroepsgroepen worden betrokken in de knelpuntenanalyse en indien van toepassing toegevoegd aan de richtlijnwerkgroep. Aangezien richtlijnen de klinische besluitvorming ondersteunen is de richtlijn ook bedoeld voor patiënten met VKB-letsel.

Samenstelling werkgroep

Voor het ontwikkelen van de richtlijn is in 2016 een multidisciplinaire werkgroep ingesteld, bestaande uit vertegenwoordigers van alle relevante specialismen die betrokken zijn bij de zorg voor patiënten met voorste kruisbandletsel te maken hebben.

 

De werkgroepleden zijn door hun beroepsverenigingen gemandateerd voor deelname.

 

De werkgroep is verantwoordelijk voor de integrale tekst van deze richtlijn.

 

Werkgroep

  • Dhr. dr. D.E. (Duncan) Meuffels, orthopaedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het Erasmus MC te Rotterdam, (NOV) (voorzitter)
  • Dhr. prof. dr. R.L. (Ron) Diercks, orthopaedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het UMCG te Groningen, (NOV)
  • Dhr. dr. R. (Roy) Hoogeslag, orthopaedisch chirurg, werkzaam in de OCON Sportmedische kliniek te Hengelo, (NOV)
  • Dhr. dr. R.W. (Reinoud) Brouwer, orthopaedisch chirurg, werkzaam in het Martini Ziekenhuis te Groningen, (NOV)
  • Dhr. dr. R.P.A. (Rob) Janssen, orthopaedisch chirurg-traumatoloog, werkzaam in het Maxima Medisch Centrum te Eindhoven/Veldhoven, (NVA)
  • Dhr. drs. P.A. (Peter) Leenhouts, traumachirurg, werkzaam in het AMC te Amsterdam, (NvVH)
  • Dhr. drs. E.A. (Edwin) Goedhart, manager sportgeneeskunde, werkzaam bij de KNVB, (VSG)
  • Dhr. dr. A.F. (Ton) Lenssen, coördinator onderzoek, werkzaam in het Maastricht UMC te Maastricht, (KNGF)

 

Meelezers:

  • Patiëntenfederatie Nederland te Utrecht (Patiëntenfederatie Nederland)

 

Met ondersteuning van:

  • Mw. dr. J. (Janneke) Hoogervorst-Schilp, adviseur, Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten
  • Mw. dr. B.H. (Bernardine) Stegeman, adviseur, Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten

Belangenverklaringen

De KNMG-Code ter voorkoming van oneigenlijke beïnvloeding door belangenverstrengeling” is gevolgd. Alle werkgroepleden hebben schriftelijk verklaard of ze in de laatste drie jaar directe financiële belangen (betrekking bij een commercieel bedrijf, persoonlijke financiële belangen, onderzoeksfinanciering) of indirecte belangen (persoonlijke relaties, reputatie management, kennisvalorisatie) hebben gehad. Een overzicht van de belangen van werkgroepleden en het oordeel over het omgaan met eventueel belangen vindt u in onderstaande tabel. De ondertekende belangenverklaringen zijn op te vragen bij het secretariaat van het Kennisinstituut van de Federatie Medisch Specialisten.

 

Werkgroeplid

Functie

Nevenfuncties

Gemelde belangen

Ondernomen actie

Meuffels

Orthopaedisch chirurg en staflid afdeling orthopaedie, Erasmus MC, Universitair Medisch Centrum Rotterdam

Buitengewoon staflid revalidatie centrum Rijndam (onbetaald)
Consulent Scapino Ballet Rotterdam (onbetaald)
Consulent Conny Janssen Danst (onbetaald)
Consulent Feyenoord Academy (onbetaald)
Consulent S.B.V. Excelsior (onbetaald)
Consulent BVO Sparta (onbetaald)
Docent Hogeschool Rotterdam (betaald
Docent Advanced knee arthroscopy en AIOS orthopaedie, Smith and Nephew (betaald)
Voorzitter congres commissie en bestuurslid Nedelandse Arthroscopie Vereniging
Voorzitter NOV werkgroep sport traumatologie

Voorzitter congrescommissie en bestuurslid Nederlandse Arthoscopie Vereniging,
voorzitter NOV-werkgroep sport traumatologie

 

ZonMW:
-kosten effectiviteit studie timing voorste kruisband-reconstructie (inclusie beëindigd)
-kosten effectiviteit studie traumatische meniscus letsel; operatie versus oefentherapie (lopende)

Reumafonds financiering:
-Observationele studieacuut voorste kruisbandletsel (inclusie beëindigd)
- RCT ESWT versus sham bij enkelartrodesen

Geen actie (onderzoek niet gesponsord door de industrie)

Diercks

Orthopaedisch chirurg, Hoogleraar klinische sportgeneeskunde UMCG

Redacteur, leerboek sportgeneeskunde; royalties auteur, leerboek voor orthopedie: royalties board of editors, American Jornal of Sports medicine: onbetaald reviewer voor wetenschappelijke tijdschriften, onbetaald.

Bovengenoemd onderzoeksproject zou op lange termijn kunnen uitmonden in een productontwikkeling. Hiervan is op dit moment en in de nabije toekomst geen sprake

Gezamenlijk onderzoek UT naar verbetering richtapparaat kruisbandreconstructie, geen externe relaties, geen externe financiering.

Geen actie (valt buiten de afbakening van de richtlijn)

Goedhart

Medisch manager SportMedisch Centrum KNVB/Bondsarts

Diverse docentschappen gericht op sportgeneeskunde

Vicevoorzitter Vereniging voor Sportgeneeskunde. Bestuurslid College Clubartsen en Consulenten.

Geen actie

Hoogeslag

Orthopaedisch chirurg 90%

Hoofd medische staf BVO FC TWENTE 10%.
Onderwijs Saxion Hogeschool, Master MSK, letsels van de knie (betaald);
congrescommissie FBK games, sportsymposium (onbetaald);
bestuurslid Vereniging voor Sportgeneeskunde (onbetaald);
begeleider wetenschappelijk onderzoek studenten Technische Geneeskunde (niet-extern-gefinancierd wetenschappelijk onderzoek van onszelf (OCON))

Return to sports criteria bij vermoeidheid; Rct naar reconstructie versus repair (hechten) van de vkb ruptuur, repair uitgevoerd met Ligamys van de firma Mathys, reconstructie uitgevoerd met all-inside techniek van de firma Arthrex, niet betaald door de industrie; inclusie beeindigd; biomechanische studie naar vkb hechting met niet-, statisch- en dynamisch-gewrichtsoverbruggende stabilisatie, niet betaald door de industrie; Rct naar type graft te gebruiken voor VKB-reconstructie (quadriceps, patellapees, hamstringspees), niet betaald door de industrie: includerend; Prospectief cohort naar hechting van gescheurde vkb, niet betaald door de industrie: METC pending

Geen actie

Leenhouts

Traumachirurg Academisch Medisch Centrum in Amsterdam

Geen

Geen

Geen actie

Brouwer

Orthopaedisch chirurg Martin Ziekenhuis Groningen

Voorzitter werkgroep knie (=DKS Dutch Knee Society onbetaald)
Medische staf FC Groningen (=betaald)

Geen

Geen actie

Lenssen

Wetenschappelijk onderzoeker afdeling fysiotherapie MUMC+ (0,8 Fte)

Senior docent faculteit gezondheidszorg Zuyd Hogeschool tutor SOMT Kerpen (D)

Geen

Geen actie

Janssen

Opleider, orthopaedisch chirurg

Onbetaalde nevenfuncties:
Secretaris Regionale Opleidingsgroep Orthopedie Zuid-Nederland (ROGO-Zuid)
Bestuurslid Coöperatie Orthopedie Groot Eindhoven
 Penningmeester
Bestuurslid Stichting AA Onderzoek en Wetenschap
 Penningmeester
Voorzitter commissie Value Measurement for Health Care MSB de Medici
Lid commissie Harvard groep Value Based Health Care Máxima Medisch Centrum Eindhoven/Veldhoven
Verantwoordelijk Persoon weefselvigilantie Máxima Medisch Centrum Eindhoven/ Veldhoven
Bestuurslid MAES (Medische Arthroscopie en Endoscopie Stichting)
 Penningmeester
Lid Scientific Committee ESSKA Congress 2018
European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery & Arthroscopy (ESSKA)
Glasgow (Schotland)
Lid Werkgroep herziening Richtlijn Voorste Kruisbandletsel - NOV
Kennisinstituut Federatie Medisch Specialisten, Utrecht
Wetenschappelijk onderzoeker
Máxima Medisch Centrum Eindhoven/ Veldhoven
Partner Sportklinisch Expertisecentrum Zuid Nederland MUMC+, Maastricht
Reviewer (inter)nationaal peer-reviewed tijdschriften en congressen NVA, ESSKA, AJSM, KSSTA, NTvG, NTvO

Geen

Geen actie

 

Inbreng patiëntenperspectief

Er werd aandacht besteed aan het patiëntenperspectief door de Patiëntenfederatie Nederland als meelezer te betrekken in het richtlijnproces. Tijdens de oriënterende zoekactie werd gezocht op literatuur naar patiëntenperspectief (zie Strategie voor zoeken en selecteren van literatuur). De conceptrichtlijn is tevens voor commentaar voorgelegd aan de Patiëntenfederatie Nederland.

Methode ontwikkeling

Evidence based

Implementatie

In de verschillende fasen van de richtlijnontwikkeling is rekening gehouden met de implementatie van de richtlijn (module) en de praktische uitvoerbaarheid van de aanbevelingen. Daarbij is uitdrukkelijk gelet op factoren die de invoering van de richtlijn in de praktijk kunnen bevorderen of belemmeren. Het implementatieplan is te vinden bij de aanverwante producten.

Werkwijze

AGREE

Deze richtlijn is opgesteld conform de eisen vermeld in het rapport Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen 2.0 van de adviescommissie Richtlijnen van de Raad Kwaliteit. Dit rapport is gebaseerd op het AGREE II instrument (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II; Brouwers, 2010), dat een internationaal breed geaccepteerd instrument is. Voor een stap-voor-stap beschrijving hoe een evidence-based richtlijn tot stand komt taewordt verwezen naar het stappenplan Ontwikkeling van Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen van het Kennisinstituut van Medisch Specialisten.

 

Knelpuntenanalyse

Tijdens de voorbereidende fase inventariseerden de voorzitter van de werkgroep en de adviseur de knelpunten. De werkgroep beoordeelde de aanbevelingen uit de eerdere richtlijn (NOV, 2011) op noodzaak tot revisie. Tevens is er een knelpuntenanalyse gehouden om te inventariseren welke knelpunten er in de praktijk bestaan rondom de zorg voor patiënten met VKB-letsel. De knelpuntenanalyse vond tijdens een Invitational conference plaats, gecombineerd met de knelpuntenanalyse voor de revisie van de richtlijn artroscopie. Hiervoor werden alle belanghebbende partijen (stakeholders) uitgenodigd. Knelpunten konden zowel medisch inhoudelijk zijn, als betrekking hebben op andere aspecten zoals organisatie van zorg, informatieoverdracht of implementatie.

 

De volgende partijen waren aanwezig bij de Invitational conference en hebben knelpunten aangedragen: Nefemed, Zorginstituut Nederland, ZimmerBiomet Nederland, Nederlandse Vereniging van Arbeids- en Bedrijfsgeneekunde (NVAB), Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap (NHG), Nederlandse Vereniging voor Radiologie (NVvR), Nederlandse Orthopaedische Vereniging (NOV). Een verslag van de Invitational conference met daarin een overzicht van partijen die uitgenodigd waren, is opgenomen in de Knelpuntenanalyse.

 

Uitgangsvragen en uitkomstmaten

Op basis van de uitkomsten van de knelpuntenanalyse zijn door de voorzitter en de adviseur concept-uitgangsvragen opgesteld. Deze zijn met de werkgroep besproken waarna de werkgroep de definitieve uitgangsvragen heeft vastgesteld. Vervolgens inventariseerde de werkgroep per uitgangsvraag welke uitkomstmaten voor de patiënt relevant zijn, waarbij zowel naar gewenste als ongewenste effecten werd gekeken. De werkgroep waardeerde deze uitkomstmaten volgens hun relatieve belang bij de besluitvorming rondom aanbevelingen, als kritiek, belangrijk (maar niet kritiek) en onbelangrijk. Tevens definieerde de werkgroep tenminste voor de kritieke uitkomstmaten welke verschillen zij klinisch (patiënt) relevant vonden.

 

Strategie voor zoeken en selecteren van literatuur

Er werd eerst oriënterend gezocht naar bestaande buitenlandse richtlijnen en naar systematische reviews in Medline (OVID) en Cochrane Library, en literatuur over patiëntenvoorkeuren en patiëntrelevante uitkomstmaten (patiëntenperspectief). Vervolgens werd voor de afzonderlijke uitgangsvragen aan de hand van specifieke zoektermen gezocht naar gepubliceerde wetenschappelijke studies in (verschillende) elektronische databases. Tevens werd aanvullend gezocht naar studies aan de hand van de literatuurlijsten van de geselecteerde artikelen. In eerste instantie werd gezocht naar studies met de hoogste mate van bewijs. De werkgroepleden selecteerden de via de zoekactie gevonden artikelen op basis van vooraf opgestelde selectiecriteria. De geselecteerde artikelen werden gebruikt om de uitgangsvraag te beantwoorden. De databases waarin is gezocht, de zoekstrategie en de gehanteerde selectiecriteria zijn te vinden in de module met desbetreffende uitgangsvraag. De zoekstrategie voor de oriënterende zoekactie en patiëntenperspectief zijn opgenomen onder aanverwante producten.

 

Kwaliteitsbeoordeling individuele studies

Individuele studies werden systematisch beoordeeld, op basis van op voorhand opgestelde methodologische kwaliteitscriteria, om zo het risico op vertekende studieresultaten (risk of bias) te kunnen inschatten. Deze beoordelingen kunt u vinden in de Risk of Bias (RoB) tabellen. De gebruikte RoB instrumenten zijn gevalideerde instrumenten die worden aanbevolen door de Cochrane Collaboration: AMSTAR – voor systematische reviews; Cochrane – voor gerandomiseerd gecontroleerd onderzoek.

 

Samenvatten van de literatuur

De relevante onderzoeksgegevens van alle geselecteerde artikelen werden overzichtelijk weergegeven in evidence-tabellen. De belangrijkste bevindingen uit de literatuur werden beschreven in de samenvatting van de literatuur. Bij een voldoende aantal studies en overeenkomstigheid (homogeniteit) tussen de studies werden de gegevens ook kwantitatief samengevat (meta-analyse) met behulp van Review Manager 5.

 

Beoordelen van de kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs

A) Voor interventievragen (vragen over therapie of screening)

De kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs werd bepaald volgens de GRADE-methode. GRADE staat voor Grading Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (zie http://www.gradeworkinggroup.org/).

 

GRADE onderscheidt vier gradaties voor de kwaliteit van het wetenschappelijk bewijs: hoog, redelijk, laag en zeer laag. Deze gradaties verwijzen naar de mate van zekerheid die er bestaat over de literatuurconclusie Schünemann, (2013).

 

GRADE

Definitie

Hoog

  • er is hoge zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • het is zeer onwaarschijnlijk dat de literatuurconclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Redelijk

  • er is redelijke zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • het is mogelijk dat de conclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Laag

  • er is lage zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • er is een reële kans dat de conclusie verandert wanneer er resultaten van nieuw grootschalig onderzoek aan de literatuuranalyse worden toegevoegd.

Zeer laag

  • er is zeer lage zekerheid dat het ware effect van behandeling dichtbij het geschatte effect van behandeling ligt zoals vermeld in de literatuurconclusie;
  • de literatuurconclusie is zeer onzeker.

 

B) Voor vragen over diagnostische tests, schade of bijwerkingen, etiologie en prognose

De kracht van het wetenschappelijke bewijs werd eveneens bepaald volgens de GRADE-methode: GRADE-diagnostiek voor diagnostische vragen (Schünemann, 2008), en een generieke GRADE-methode voor vragen over schade of bijwerkingen, etiologie en prognose. In de gehanteerde generieke GRADE-methode werden de basisprincipes van de GRADE-methodiek toegepast: het benoemen en prioriteren van de klinisch (patiënt) relevante uitkomstmaten, een systematische review per uitkomstmaat, en een beoordeling van bewijskracht op basis van de vijf GRADE-criteria (startpunt hoog; downgraden voor risk of bias, inconsistentie, indirectheid, imprecisie, en publicatiebias).

 

Formuleren van de conclusies

Voor elke relevante uitkomstmaat werd het wetenschappelijk bewijs samengevat in een of meerdere literatuurconclusies waarbij het niveau van bewijs werd bepaald volgens de GRADE-methodiek. De werkgroepleden maakten de balans op van elke interventie (overall conclusie). Bij het opmaken van de balans werden de gunstige en ongunstige effecten voor de patiënt afgewogen. De overall bewijskracht wordt bepaald door de laagste bewijskracht gevonden bij een van de kritieke uitkomstmaten. Bij complexe besluitvorming waarin naast de conclusies uit de systematische literatuuranalyse vele aanvullende argumenten (overwegingen) een rol spelen, werd afgezien van een overall conclusie. In dat geval werden de gunstige en ongunstige effecten van de interventies samen met alle aanvullende argumenten gewogen onder het kopje Overwegingen.

 

Overwegingen (van bewijs naar aanbeveling)

Om te komen tot een aanbeveling zijn naast (de kwaliteit van) het wetenschappelijke bewijs ook andere aspecten belangrijk en worden meegewogen, zoals de expertise van de werkgroepleden, de waarden en voorkeuren van de patiënt (patient values and preferences), kosten, beschikbaarheid van voorzieningen en organisatorische zaken. Deze aspecten worden, voor zover geen onderdeel van de literatuursamenvatting, vermeld en beoordeeld (gewogen) onder het kopje Overwegingen.

 

Formuleren van aanbevelingen

De aanbevelingen geven antwoord op de uitgangsvraag en zijn gebaseerd op het beschikbare wetenschappelijke bewijs en de belangrijkste overwegingen, en een weging van de gunstige en ongunstige effecten van de relevante interventies. De kracht van het wetenschappelijk bewijs en het gewicht dat door de werkgroep wordt toegekend aan de overwegingen, bepalen samen de sterkte van de aanbeveling. Conform de GRADE-methodiek sluit een lage bewijskracht van conclusies in de systematische literatuuranalyse een sterke aanbeveling niet a priori uit, en zijn bij een hoge bewijskracht ook zwakke aanbevelingen mogelijk. De sterkte van de aanbeveling wordt altijd bepaald door weging van alle relevante argumenten tezamen.

 

Randvoorwaarden (Organisatie van zorg)

In de knelpuntenanalyse en bij de ontwikkeling van de richtlijn is expliciet rekening gehouden met de organisatie van zorg: alle aspecten die randvoorwaardelijk zijn voor het verlenen van zorg (zoals coördinatie, communicatie, (financiële) middelen, menskracht en infrastructuur). Randvoorwaarden die relevant zijn voor het beantwoorden van een specifieke uitgangsvraag maken onderdeel uit van de overwegingen bij de bewuste uitgangsvraag.

 

Kennislacunes

Tijdens de ontwikkeling van deze richtlijn is systematisch gezocht naar onderzoek waarvan de resultaten bijdragen aan een antwoord op de uitgangsvragen. Bij elke uitgangsvraag is door de werkgroep nagegaan of er (aanvullend) wetenschappelijk onderzoek gewenst is om de uitgangsvraag te kunnen beantwoorden. Een overzicht van de onderwerpen waarvoor (aanvullend) wetenschappelijk van belang wordt geacht, is als aanbeveling in de Kennislacunes beschreven (onder aanverwante producten).

 

Literatuur

Brouwers MC, Kho ME, Browman GP, et al. AGREE Next Steps Consortium. AGREE II: advancing guideline development, reporting and evaluation in health care. CMAJ. 2010;182(18):E839-42. doi: 10.1503/cmaj.090449. Epub 2010 Jul 5. Review. PubMed PMID: 20603348.

Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen 2.0 (2012). Adviescommissie Richtlijnen van de Raad Kwalitieit. https://richtlijnendatabase.nl/over_deze_site/richtlijnontwikkeling.html.

Schünemann H, Brożek J, Guyatt G, et al. GRADE handbook for grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations. Updated October 2013. The GRADE Working Group, 2013. Available from http://gdt.guidelinedevelopment.org/central_prod/_design/client/handbook/handbook.html.

Schünemann HJ, Oxman AD, Brozek J, et al. Grading quality of evidence and strength of recommendations for diagnostic tests and strategies. BMJ. 2008;336(7653):1106-10. doi: 10.1136/bmj.39500.677199.AE. Erratum in: BMJ. 2008;336(7654). doi: 10.1136/bmj.a139. PubMed PMID: 18483053.

Ontwikkeling van Medisch Specialistische Richtlijnen: stappenplan. Kennisinstituut van Medisch Specialisten.

Zoekverantwoording

Zoekacties zijn opvraagbaar. Neem hiervoor contact op met de Richtlijnendatabase.